Workshop Format// Formats des Ateliers

Panel/Présentations avec discussion du panel

Title// Titre

Panel 12 Rural landscapes and urban development in Latin America - Identification, conservation and management

DOI

https://doi.org/10.7275/2er1-0v38

Biographical Information // Informations biographiques

Prof. Dr. Leonardo Barci Castriota (ICOMOS/BRAZIL / Vice-President ICOMOS) is an architect and urban planner and Ph.D. in Philosophy from Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil. Distinguished Professor and Coordinator of the Postgraduate Course on Built Environment and Sustainable Heritage at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil. Senior Researcher at the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq). Trustee of the Brazilian National Institute of Historic and Artistic Heritage / IPHAN. Member of the Board of the Brazilian Institute of Architects (IAB). Former Guest Scholar at the Getty Conservation Institute. President of Icomos Brazil since 2015, and Vice President of ICOMOS since December 2017.

Prof. Dr. Mario Ferrada Aguilar (ICOMOS/CHILE) is an architect at the University of Valparaíso-Chile (2001), Ph.D. Architect in Heritage of the Polytechnic University of Madrid. Postgraduate in Conservation of Monuments, of the Institute of the Historical Cultural Artistic Heritage (IPHAC) Salvador de Bahía, Brazil. Diploma in Advanced Studies in Urban Planning and Territorial Organization (DEA), from the Polytechnic University of Madrid and Diploma in History of Architecture, from the University of Valparaíso-Chile. Academic, researcher and teacher of the Institute of History and Heritage, of the Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism, University of Chile. He worked for 12 years as an architect of the Municipality of Valparaíso, where he was responsible for the postulation of the "Historic Area of the City-Port of Valparaíso" as a World Heritage Site (2003). He is currently President of the Chilean Committee of the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS Chile), Expert Member of the International Scientific Committee of Historic Villages and Towns (CIVVIH ICOMOS).

Keywords

Cultural Landscapes, Rural Heritage, Latin America, World Heritage, Latin American rural heritage

Abstract // Résumé

Within the perspective opened in the last decades by the expansion of the concept of heritage, some new ideas have been playing a decisive and innovative role. One of them will be that of "cultural landscape", which, adopted by UNESCO since the early 1990s, inextricably combines the material and immaterial aspects of the concept, often thought separately, indicating the significant interactions between man and the natural environment. Thus, this concept seems to offer a rich perspective when applied also to the traditional ideas in the field of conservation, and may serve, for example, to broaden the perspective over the historical centers themselves, allowing interpretations that focus precisely on the interactions between the natural and cultural aspects, the tangible and intangible dimensions of these ensembles, often ignored. From this expanded understanding, it seems possible to propose integrated strategies of intervention that, by combining these different aspects, end up being much more complete answers to the complex challenges of urban conservation.

Conserving and managing cultural landscapes are among the most complex challenges facing heritage today. If conceptualizing cultural landscape already proves to be a difficult task, this difficulty deepens when it comes to formulating strategies for the treatment of this special category of heritage. The USA National Park Service has been making a significant effort in this direction, issuing guidelines on cultural landscapes in 1992, distinguishing between various types of intervention - preservation, restoration, revitalization of landscapes. This is not an easy task, since it is not only a question of sticking to the aesthetic dimension of the landscape, and correct treatment of them must involve both the functional dimension of these landscapes and their ecological dimension.

Today many of these traditional uses of land - and related products - that were widely accepted without further reflection are in danger of being destabilized and destroyed. Demographic changes, increasing land value, industrialization of agricultural production, and competition from world markets are revolutionizing traditional social and economic relations with the land. In Latin America, the pressures and threats of urban globalization represent one of the greatest risks to rural landscapes and the balance between man and nature. The speed and scope of these changes are unprecedented in our region, where the urban territory advances at an accelerated pace, absorbing cultivated lands and have significant implications for the management of cultural heritage, including the fragmentation and change of cultural landscapes, the loss of traditional product markets, and even the erosion of regional identity and distinction. Thus, preserving cultural landscapes will often be confronted with traditional forms of agriculture.

In his time of globalization, knowledge, registration, and support for these traditional, highly endangered practices are even more necessary, as their disappearance would mean not only a cultural loss but also a negative contribution to the ecological impoverishment of the planet and to climate change. This session aims to explore the ample array of rural landscapes in Latin American, presenting examples of how cultural and natural dimensions combine in our rural landscape heritage, and also some possible conservation responses that aim to safeguard these dynamic systems.

ABSTRACT SOBRE EL CAMINO TIERRA ADENTRO COMO PAISAJE RURAL.pdf (73 kB)
3rd presentation abstract

Marrakesh CASTRIOTA ADAMS LAC 2019 october.docx (31 kB)
1st presentation text

Adams Castriota LAC Marrakesh 2019 red.pptx (2873 kB)
1st presentation ´power point

FOTOS LAC-CRTA-RURAL HERITAGE-17Oct2019.pptx (2512 kB)
3rd preentation power point

Painel LAC - index 3 papers and Authors.docx (16 kB)
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Calderon Salcedo Abstract.pdf (121 kB)
2nd presentatiton abstract

Calderon - Salcedo Presentation.pptx (12670 kB)
2nd presentation power point

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Panel 12 Rural landscapes and urban development in Latin America - Identification, conservation and management

Within the perspective opened in the last decades by the expansion of the concept of heritage, some new ideas have been playing a decisive and innovative role. One of them will be that of "cultural landscape", which, adopted by UNESCO since the early 1990s, inextricably combines the material and immaterial aspects of the concept, often thought separately, indicating the significant interactions between man and the natural environment. Thus, this concept seems to offer a rich perspective when applied also to the traditional ideas in the field of conservation, and may serve, for example, to broaden the perspective over the historical centers themselves, allowing interpretations that focus precisely on the interactions between the natural and cultural aspects, the tangible and intangible dimensions of these ensembles, often ignored. From this expanded understanding, it seems possible to propose integrated strategies of intervention that, by combining these different aspects, end up being much more complete answers to the complex challenges of urban conservation.

Conserving and managing cultural landscapes are among the most complex challenges facing heritage today. If conceptualizing cultural landscape already proves to be a difficult task, this difficulty deepens when it comes to formulating strategies for the treatment of this special category of heritage. The USA National Park Service has been making a significant effort in this direction, issuing guidelines on cultural landscapes in 1992, distinguishing between various types of intervention - preservation, restoration, revitalization of landscapes. This is not an easy task, since it is not only a question of sticking to the aesthetic dimension of the landscape, and correct treatment of them must involve both the functional dimension of these landscapes and their ecological dimension.

Today many of these traditional uses of land - and related products - that were widely accepted without further reflection are in danger of being destabilized and destroyed. Demographic changes, increasing land value, industrialization of agricultural production, and competition from world markets are revolutionizing traditional social and economic relations with the land. In Latin America, the pressures and threats of urban globalization represent one of the greatest risks to rural landscapes and the balance between man and nature. The speed and scope of these changes are unprecedented in our region, where the urban territory advances at an accelerated pace, absorbing cultivated lands and have significant implications for the management of cultural heritage, including the fragmentation and change of cultural landscapes, the loss of traditional product markets, and even the erosion of regional identity and distinction. Thus, preserving cultural landscapes will often be confronted with traditional forms of agriculture.

In his time of globalization, knowledge, registration, and support for these traditional, highly endangered practices are even more necessary, as their disappearance would mean not only a cultural loss but also a negative contribution to the ecological impoverishment of the planet and to climate change. This session aims to explore the ample array of rural landscapes in Latin American, presenting examples of how cultural and natural dimensions combine in our rural landscape heritage, and also some possible conservation responses that aim to safeguard these dynamic systems.