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Clay Pot Cookery: Dairy, Diet and Class during the South Levantine Iron Age II Period

Abstract
Goody’s (1982) model of cooking and its relation to hierarchy posits a correlation between class and cuisine that is typical of societies practicing intensive agriculture and creating storable surpluses. This archaeological case study tests his model using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses to investigate ancient food remains (fatty acids) preserved in unglazed clay cooking ceramics from archaeological sites across the Iron Age II period (1000-586 BCE) kingdoms of the southern Levant. These kingdoms are known historically as Ammon, Aram (Aram-Damascus), Edom, Israel, Judah, Moab and Philistia. Samples from this time period and region are suitable for use in this research because archaeological evidence dating to the Iron Age II (1000-586 BCE) indicates socially stratified populations practicing intensive agriculture. Laboratory results suggest differences in south Levantine clay pot cookery related to environment and to social hierarchy.
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dissertation
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