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ORCID

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7348-6676

Access Type

Open Access Thesis

Document Type

thesis

Embargo Period

8-13-2020

Degree Program

Food Science

Degree Type

Master of Science (M.S.)

Year Degree Awarded

2020

Month Degree Awarded

September

Abstract

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. The global burden of colorectal cancer is also expected to increase by 60%, to over 2.2 million new cases and 1.1 million annual deaths, by the year 2030. Jackfruit is known for its packed nutrition including many antioxidants: vitamin C, carotenoids and flavanones. It has also been used in traditional medicine due to its potential protection against many chronic diseases. However, there is limited research studying the potential effect of jackfruit on colorectal cancer. Here, we used a well-established AOM/DSS mice model to investigate the impact of jackfruit-derived extracts on colitis-associated colorectal cancer. After 6-week treatment with diet containing 480 ppm jackfruit-derived extracts, the mice showed significantly alleviated colon tumorigenesis with a 46% decrease in tumor numbers of each mouse compared to vehicle group (2.1 ± 0.31 for 480 ppm jackfruit-derived fraction group vs 3.9 ± 0.67 for vehicle group, P < 0.05). The expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines (Il-6 and Inf- γ) and pro-tumorigenic genes (Axin2, Vegf, Myc and Pcna) was also decreased in the group consuming 480 ppm jackfruit-derived extracts compared to the vehicle group. Together the results suggest that the consumption of jackfruit-derived extracts could protect against colitis-associated colorectal carcinogenesis in mice.

First Advisor

Guodong Zhang

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