Track Session Type

The Value of Open

Presentation Type

Presentation

Objectives of the Session

Explore some of the challenges inherent to the emerging OER movement Equip attendees with the perspectives and language to recognize these challenges at their own institutions and consider possible solutions

Full Description of the Session

In our rush to scale OER, are we considering the inequities built into emerging models that could cause potential harm? How is institutional isomorphism potentially driving homogenization and consolidation of these harmful models? This presentation will explore three epicenters of potential harm: the student, faculty, and institutional levels.

Special Zoom Requests

projector (HDMI), internet access, audio speakers.

Presenter Bios

Steve Phillips serves as the Associate Director for Thomas Edison State University's Center for the Assessment of Learning (CAL). An ardent advocate for access and affordability, Steve has led the development of numerous open and competency-based education initiatives, including the Open Course Option, JetBlue Scholars Program, and the Precision Learning Direct Assessment Program. Currently, he is pursuing his EdD in Higher Education at Temple University exploring the utility of faculty coaching models.

Dr. Lindsey B. "Luka" Carfagna is a visiting scholar in the Department of Informatics (Connected Learning Lab) at UC Irvine, works full time as a Learning Experience and Assessment Specialist at Thomas Edison State University, and teaches sociology online as an adjunct professor. She can usually be found lurking wherever connected communities meet economic, educational, and ecological challenges and her dissertation focused on how young people utilized open learning resources and practices as a buffer for hard economic times after the 2008 crisis and subsequent recession.

Start Date

31-5-2018 11:35 AM

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May 31st, 11:35 AM

Do No Harm: Questioning the Long-Term Implications of OER

In our rush to scale OER, are we considering the inequities built into emerging models that could cause potential harm? How is institutional isomorphism potentially driving homogenization and consolidation of these harmful models? This presentation will explore three epicenters of potential harm: the student, faculty, and institutional levels.