Track Session Type

Implementing and Scaling OER Initiatives

Presentation Type

Panel Presentation

OER Level of Expertise

Beginner, Intermediate

Audience

Librarian, Administrator

Session Abstract

How can you start or “scale-up” OER practices at your institution? Each of 24 CUNY campuses has developed unique OER initiatives, aligned with campus culture. Hear about individual case studies and x-campus collaboration, about developing, evolving, and scaling up OER initiatives at community colleges, four-year colleges, and graduate research institutions.

Objectives of the Session

  • Attendees will learn about different models of OER initiatives, playing out at various types of institutions, in order to design workable and scalable programs for their own institutions.

  • Attendees will gain insight into best practices for advocacy on campus, support for OER development and adoption, addressing specific challenges, and more, in order to apply lessons learned in their own institutional contexts.

Full Description of the Session

How can you get started with or “scale-up” OER practices at your institution? And how will the library fit in? Two or three years ago, “OER Librarian” wasn’t even a title, but in a relatively short time librarians at all 24 campuses of the City University of New York (CUNY) have taken on a multitude of different roles to support OER initiatives. Each campus has come on board with its own timeline and developed its own structure and workflows to accomplish this work, in alignment with campus culture. While many have taken positions in support of individual faculty OER developers and become fierce advocates for open initiatives, the full range of how librarians contribute plays out very differently on each campus. At the same time, librarians collaborate across the campuses via an OER committee/working group overseen by the CUNY Office of Library Services, uniquely positioning us to observe and discuss best practices as well as the varying models of OER support. Join us for a panel featuring individual case studies and a facilitated conversation among CUNY OER librarians about developing, evolving, and scaling up OER initiatives at community colleges, four-year colleges, and graduate research institutions. We will explore questions such as: Which entity on campus is in the driver’s seat? How does intra-campus collaboration play out? What are the labor implications of these new initiatives for librarians and other faculty? Where do definitions of OER, ZTC (zero-textbook cost), and open pedagogy intersect and overlap?

Special Zoom Requests

Our session will feature a facilitated discussion among panelists, so multiple table mics would be helpful.

Presenter Bios

Linda Miles is Assistant Professor and OER Librarian at Eugenio María de Hostos Community College – City University of New York, having served previously as Public Services and User Experience Librarian at Yeshiva University. Recent publications include “But What Do the Students Think: Results of the CUNY Cross-Campus Zero-Textbook Cost Student Survey” (Open Praxis, 11(1), 2019). She is currently co-authoring a book, How to Thrive as a Library Professional: Achieving Success and Satisfaction, for Libraries Unlimited. Linda’s research interests include game design for media literacy instruction and students’ reading and college readiness.

Elvis Bakaitis is an Adjunct Reference Librarian at The Graduate Center and New York City College of Technology (CityTech), both part of the City University of New York. They have worked on OER initiatives at both campuses, including Faculty Fellowships and OER Literature Reviews. Elvis helped to develop the OER Bootcamp at the Graduate Center Library and the upcoming event Breaking Through: An Open Pedagogy Symposium. Their research interests include creative approaches to library instruction, queer history education, and the use of zines as a medium for knowledge production.

Cailean Cooney is Assistant Professor and OER Librarian at New York City College of Technology, CUNY, where she coordinates the Library’s Open Educational Resources (O.E.R.) initiative. She has published about the impact of O.E.R. on the student experience in Open Praxis and the International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning. Her interests include foregrounding student-centered approaches and universal design principles into professional development programs.

Madeline Ford has been serving as the Chief Librarian at Hostos Community College, CUNY since 2011. She is firmly committed to public higher education and works towards providing a library environment that fosters and supports student success. At Hostos she is committed to building a print and electronic collection to serve the students and also support the research and scholarly needs of faculty and staff. Most recently she embarked on a journey with the Early Childhood Education Unit to develop an OER degree. This endeavor has led to the expansion of OER across the disciplines.

Stacy Katz is Assistant Professor and Open Resources Librarian-STEM Liaison at Lehman College, CUNY. She initiated, developed, and oversees the Open Educational Resources (OER) initiative at Lehman College. Stacy is a 2018-2019 OER Research Fellow and is a co-author on “But What Do the Students Think: Results of the CUNY Cross-Campus Zero-Textbook Cost Student Survey” (Open Praxis, 11(1), 2019) and authors a column on OER for the Journal of New Librarianship.

Leslie Ward is Assistant Professor and Emerging Technologies and Digital Scholarship Librarian at Queensborough Community College, CUNY. She received her MS in Library and Information Science from Simmons College and her MA in the History of Medicine from Oxford Brookes University. In conjunction with QCC’s Center for Teaching and Learning, Leslie advises faculty on OER development including access to library resources, digital media searching and management, copyright, and accessibility. Leslie has recently presented on teaching copyright as a non-lawyer as well as in her academic specialty, the intersection of mental illness, crime, and experience in the 19th century.

Location

163C

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Start Date

22-5-2019 1:05 PM

End Date

22-5-2019 1:55 PM

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May 22nd, 1:05 PM May 22nd, 1:55 PM

Get on Your Feet and Up To Speed: Ways to Start-Up or Scale-Up an OER Initiative

163C

How can you get started with or “scale-up” OER practices at your institution? And how will the library fit in? Two or three years ago, “OER Librarian” wasn’t even a title, but in a relatively short time librarians at all 24 campuses of the City University of New York (CUNY) have taken on a multitude of different roles to support OER initiatives. Each campus has come on board with its own timeline and developed its own structure and workflows to accomplish this work, in alignment with campus culture. While many have taken positions in support of individual faculty OER developers and become fierce advocates for open initiatives, the full range of how librarians contribute plays out very differently on each campus. At the same time, librarians collaborate across the campuses via an OER committee/working group overseen by the CUNY Office of Library Services, uniquely positioning us to observe and discuss best practices as well as the varying models of OER support. Join us for a panel featuring individual case studies and a facilitated conversation among CUNY OER librarians about developing, evolving, and scaling up OER initiatives at community colleges, four-year colleges, and graduate research institutions. We will explore questions such as: Which entity on campus is in the driver’s seat? How does intra-campus collaboration play out? What are the labor implications of these new initiatives for librarians and other faculty? Where do definitions of OER, ZTC (zero-textbook cost), and open pedagogy intersect and overlap?

 

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