Track Session Type

The Value of Open Creation: OER Creation & Management, Copyright, Licensing, and CC 101, Instructional Design and Ed Tech for OER, Open Pedagogy

Presentation Type

Presentation

OER Level of Expertise

Intermediate, Advanced

Audience

Faculty, Librarian, instructional designer, Staff

Session Abstract

As faculty become aware of the benefits of open educational resources and other affordable material, many are confronted with the problem of losing access to ancillary content like test banks and slides. This session will provide an overview of existing affordable ancillary material, tips for finding it, and faculty-created examples.

Objectives of the Session

After attending the presentation, attendees will be able to:

-identify sources and platforms of open or affordable ancillary materials

-develop a plan for supporting faculty in creating ancillary materials themselves or with students as part of an open pedagogy project

Full Description of the Session

As more faculty become aware of the benefits of open educational resources and other affordable course material, many are confronted with the problem of losing access to ancillary content like test banks, homework assignments, and PowerPoint slides, which they have come to rely on from commercial publishers. For some faculty, this barrier is insurmountable, compelling them to continue using expensive commercial textbooks, even if they believe in the cause of open education. Publishers, vendors, and faculty have been slowly addressing the ancillary material problem by developing low-cost, free, and/or openly-licensed ancillary options. However, it can be very difficult to find these materials to use or suggest to faculty.

In this session, I will provide an overview of the existing platforms and producers of ancillary materials, as well as tips for trying to find this material. I’ll also give an overview of how faculty can be actively involved in creating new ancillary material for existing open textbooks, drawing both from examples at other institutions and several successful projects at my own institution.

To engage the audience during the presentation, I will use polling software to ask relevant questions throughout. I will also end the presentation with an interactive ancillary material search challenge that will allow attendees to use the skills shared in the session to practice finding ancillary materials themselves.

Presenter Bios

Mandi Goodsett is the Performing Arts and Humanities Librarian as well as the OER and Copyright Advisor at Cleveland State University in Ohio. She serves as an OhioLINK Affordable Learning Ambassador and an instructor for the Open Education Network Certificate in OER Librarianship Certification. She is also co-coordinates the library’s Textbook Affordability Grant to promote the adoption of open textbooks. Her research interests include open education, information literacy, and critical thinking in library instruction.

Publishing Permission

1

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 License

Start Date

27-5-2022 11:00 AM

End Date

27-5-2022 11:30 AM

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May 27th, 11:00 AM May 27th, 11:30 AM

“But Where is the Courseware?” Finding, Creating, and Using Ancillary OER Materials

As more faculty become aware of the benefits of open educational resources and other affordable course material, many are confronted with the problem of losing access to ancillary content like test banks, homework assignments, and PowerPoint slides, which they have come to rely on from commercial publishers. For some faculty, this barrier is insurmountable, compelling them to continue using expensive commercial textbooks, even if they believe in the cause of open education. Publishers, vendors, and faculty have been slowly addressing the ancillary material problem by developing low-cost, free, and/or openly-licensed ancillary options. However, it can be very difficult to find these materials to use or suggest to faculty.

In this session, I will provide an overview of the existing platforms and producers of ancillary materials, as well as tips for trying to find this material. I’ll also give an overview of how faculty can be actively involved in creating new ancillary material for existing open textbooks, drawing both from examples at other institutions and several successful projects at my own institution.

To engage the audience during the presentation, I will use polling software to ask relevant questions throughout. I will also end the presentation with an interactive ancillary material search challenge that will allow attendees to use the skills shared in the session to practice finding ancillary materials themselves.