Title

Structural properties of pegged timber connections as affected by end distance

Publication Date

2003

Journal or Book Title

FOREST PRODUCTS JOURNAL

Abstract

This study investigates the influence of end distance on the mechanical behavior of wood-dowel or 'pegged' joints, commonly used in traditional mortise-and-tenon joinery. Static tensile tests were performed on double shear joints, connected with a single 1-inch-diameter northern red oak peg, loaded parallel to the grain of the center member. Specimens were prepared from three species commonly used to build timber-frame homes in the northeastern United States: Douglas-fir, eastern white pine, and northern red oak. Load deformation data (joint stiffness, proportional limit, 5percent offset yield load and ultimate load) were analyzed using analysis of variance techniques to gauge influence of varying end distance. It was found that in no case did reduction of end distance significantly influence joint stiffness. Eastern white pine and northern red oak joints showed no significant reduction in tensile capacity when end distance was reduced to one half of the end distance required for full design load specified by the National Design Specification® for Wood Construction® (NDS-97). Joints with end distances shorter than this, however, showed the potential for undesirable abrupt and catastrophic failures. Douglas-fir joints showed significant reduction in yield strength at 67 percent of the full design end distance and displayed abrupt failures even at 100 percent of the required NDS-97 end distance.

Volume

53

Issue

2

Pages

50-57

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