Title

Distributive Justice in Fisheries Management

Publication Date

1993

Journal or Book Title

FISHERIES

Abstract

Based on current demand for fishery resources and the status of fish stocks, many marine species are scarce. When scarcity requires the allocation of fishery resources among competing interests, not all interests will receive the allocation they want or feel they deserve. There will be claims of unjust allocations, and the issues of fairness and justice will be raised by anglers and commercial fishers. The Magnuson Fishery Conservation and Management Act requires that allocations be fair and equitable; however, what is meant by these terms, or the likely response to allocations perceived to be unfair or inequitable, is not clear or easily agreed upon. Some means of understanding, evaluating, and responding to these claims is needed. Distributive justice pertains to the fairness of the distribution of conditions and goods that affect individual well-being. Two major conceptual approaches to the study of distributive justice are equity theory and relative deprivation. Differences between these two conceptual approaches are discussed. Two case studies illustrate how equity theory and relative deprivation can be applied to enhance management understanding of constituency response to allocation decisions. Five research needs are identified.

DOI

10.1577/1548-8446(1993)018<0014:DJIFM>2.0.CO;2

Volume

18

Issue

2

Pages

14-18

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS