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DOI

https://doi.org/10.7275/bwnx-mz97

Abstract

Approaches to correcting correlation coefficients for range restriction have been developed under the framework of large sample theory. The accuracy of missing data techniques for correcting correlation coefficients for range restriction has thus far only been investigated with relatively large samples. However, researchers and evaluators are often faced with a small or moderate number of applicants but must still attempt to estimate the population correlation between predictor and criterion. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the accuracy of population correlation estimates and their associated standard error in terms of small and moderate sample sizes. We applied multiple imputation by chained equations for continuous and naturally dichotomous criterion variables. The results show that multiple imputation by chained equations is accurate for a continuous criterion variable, even for a small number of applicants when the selection ratio is not too small. In the case of a naturally dichotomous criterion variable, a small or moderate number of applicants leads to biased estimates when the selection ratio is small. In contrast, the standard error of the population correlation estimate is accurate over a wide range of conditions of sample size, selection ratio, true population correlation, for continuous and naturally dichotomous criterion variables, and for direct and indirect range restriction scenarios. The findings of this study provide empirical evidence about the accuracy of the correction, and support researchers and evaluators in their assessment of conditions under which correlation coefficients corrected for range restriction can be trusted. Accessed 2,759 times on https://pareonline.net from September 13, 2016 to December 31, 2019. For downloads from January 1, 2020 forward, please click on the PlumX Metrics link to the right.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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