Presenter Bios (50 Words)

So Young Park, M.S., is pursuing a Ph.D. degree in the Department of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Management at Pennsylvania State University, University Park. Her research interests include data-driven analysis in tourism, information science and technology in tourism economics, and human rights issues in tourism.

Jee Bin Ahn is a Ph.D. student in the Educational Theory and Policy program at the Pennsylvania State University. Her research interests include educational inequality, policy analysis and program evaluation.

Bing Pan, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in the Department of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Management at Pennsylvania State University, University Park. His research interests include data analytics, tourism big data, destination marketing, and benefits of travel.

Abstract (150 Words)

This study investigates a popular belief: family trips provide educational benefits for children. Based on the theoretical background of experiential learning, we empirically examine the impact of family trips on academic achievement in early childhood using Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Kindergarten Class of 1998–99 (ECLS-K) data collected by the National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES). The 3,224 children included in the study are a nationally representative sample. The results show that family trips–especially those to museums, art galleries, and historical sites–has positive impact on children’s academic achievement in reading. As the experiential learning requires reflection and experimentation and is enhanced with repetition, learning from family trips occurs not immediately but rather over time. This study provides rationale for the promotion of family trips for their educational benefits and endorses further examination of different types of trips and travel.

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Family Trips and Academic Achievement in Reading during Early Childhood: Evidence from a National Study

This study investigates a popular belief: family trips provide educational benefits for children. Based on the theoretical background of experiential learning, we empirically examine the impact of family trips on academic achievement in early childhood using Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Kindergarten Class of 1998–99 (ECLS-K) data collected by the National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES). The 3,224 children included in the study are a nationally representative sample. The results show that family trips–especially those to museums, art galleries, and historical sites–has positive impact on children’s academic achievement in reading. As the experiential learning requires reflection and experimentation and is enhanced with repetition, learning from family trips occurs not immediately but rather over time. This study provides rationale for the promotion of family trips for their educational benefits and endorses further examination of different types of trips and travel.