Title of Paper

Examining the Risky Decision-Making Process: The Influence of Risk Perceptions and Efficacy Beliefs on Intentions to Engage in Personal Protective Behaviors

Presenter Bios (50 Words)

Ashley Schroeder, Ph.D. is the Managing Director of the Tourism Crisis Management Initiative at the University of Florida. Her research emphasizes how the tourism industry prepares for, responds to, and recovers from situations that affect consumer confidence or normal business operations in a destination. Within the area of tourism crisis management, one of her research streams focuses on understanding the underlying nature and subsequent influences of tourists’ risk perceptions and engagement in recommended personal protective behaviors.

Dr. Lori Pennington-Gray is the Director of the Tourism Crisis Management Initiative at the University of Florida and Professor in the Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management. Her current research primarily focuses on crisis management strategies for the tourism industry.

Abstract (150 Words)

Tourism scholars have begun to criticize risk perception studies. To address several of their criticisms, this study examined factors that may influence tourists’ intentions to engage in personal protective behaviors (PPBs). The theoretical framework was based on protection motivation theory and the risk-as-feelings hypothesis. Findings associated with the multidimensional nature of risk perceptions supported the risk-as-feelings hypothesis. Response efficacy and self-efficacy were significant, positive predictors of intentions to engage in 15 of the 15 recommended PPBs. In terms of risk perceptions, a distinction was found between the predictors of the 7 PPBs that respondents were most likely to engage in and the 8 PPBs that respondents were least likely to engage in. Perceived severity was a significant, positive predictor of intentions to engage in 6 of the top 7 PPBs. Perceived vulnerability/affective risk perceptions was a significant, positive predictor of intentions to engage in the bottom 8 PPBs.

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Examining the Risky Decision-Making Process: The Influence of Risk Perceptions and Efficacy Beliefs on Intentions to Engage in Personal Protective Behaviors

Tourism scholars have begun to criticize risk perception studies. To address several of their criticisms, this study examined factors that may influence tourists’ intentions to engage in personal protective behaviors (PPBs). The theoretical framework was based on protection motivation theory and the risk-as-feelings hypothesis. Findings associated with the multidimensional nature of risk perceptions supported the risk-as-feelings hypothesis. Response efficacy and self-efficacy were significant, positive predictors of intentions to engage in 15 of the 15 recommended PPBs. In terms of risk perceptions, a distinction was found between the predictors of the 7 PPBs that respondents were most likely to engage in and the 8 PPBs that respondents were least likely to engage in. Perceived severity was a significant, positive predictor of intentions to engage in 6 of the top 7 PPBs. Perceived vulnerability/affective risk perceptions was a significant, positive predictor of intentions to engage in the bottom 8 PPBs.