Title of Paper

Assessing Residents’ Attitudes towards STVRs in Urban Neighborhoods

Presenter Bios

Emily Yeager, Ph.D. Candidate

Emily Yeager is currently at the University of Georgia pursuing a Ph.D. in Sustainable Tourism and Integrative Conservation. Her current research focuses on assessing the social, environmental, and economic impacts of short-term vacation rentals from the perspective of residents and STVR hosts.

Bynum Boley, Ph.D.

Bynum Boley is an Assistant Professor at the University of Georgia. His research focuses on sustainable tourism with special attention to how the natural and cultural resources of communities can be protected, packaged and marketed to jointly increase sustainability, resident quality of life and a community's competitiveness as a destination."

Kyle Woosnam, Ph.D.

Kyle M. Woosnam is an Associate Professor in Natural Resources Recreation and Tourism at the University of Georgia, USA. His primary line of research concerns tourism planning as it relates to the social relationships that exist in tourist destinations between residents and tourists.

Gary Green, Ph.D.

Dr. Green is an Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs and Professor within the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources at the University of Georgia. Dr. Green regularly teaches and conducts research on subjects related to natural resource management, outdoor recreation, environmental interpretation, and the human dimensions of natural resources.

Abstract

Assessing Residents’ Attitudes towards STVRs in Urban Neighborhoods

Abstract

This study aims to model residents’ support for short term vacation rentals (STVRs) in Savannah, GA, a city that experiences year-round visitation and has actively discussed and attempted to legislate STVRs. Through a combination of Weber’s Theory of Formal and Substantive Rationality and Social Exchange Theory, intrinsic (substantive) factors of Psychological, Social and Political Empowerment and Perceived Environmental Sustainability along with the extrinsic (formal) factor of Personal Economic Benefit are tested for their influence on residents’ attitudes towards and overall support for STVRs. Structural equation model analysis reveals good model fit with support for ten our of seventeen proposed hypotheses and 75% of the variance in residents’ Support for STVRs explained by the model. While the City of Savannah implemented its most recent STVR regulations in September 2017, the debate remains as to whether policies comprehensively address residents’ concerns regarding STVR development.

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Assessing Residents’ Attitudes towards STVRs in Urban Neighborhoods

Assessing Residents’ Attitudes towards STVRs in Urban Neighborhoods

Abstract

This study aims to model residents’ support for short term vacation rentals (STVRs) in Savannah, GA, a city that experiences year-round visitation and has actively discussed and attempted to legislate STVRs. Through a combination of Weber’s Theory of Formal and Substantive Rationality and Social Exchange Theory, intrinsic (substantive) factors of Psychological, Social and Political Empowerment and Perceived Environmental Sustainability along with the extrinsic (formal) factor of Personal Economic Benefit are tested for their influence on residents’ attitudes towards and overall support for STVRs. Structural equation model analysis reveals good model fit with support for ten our of seventeen proposed hypotheses and 75% of the variance in residents’ Support for STVRs explained by the model. While the City of Savannah implemented its most recent STVR regulations in September 2017, the debate remains as to whether policies comprehensively address residents’ concerns regarding STVR development.