Presenter Bios (50 Words)

Lisheng (Steven) Weng is a PhD candidate in the School of Geography and Planning at Sun Yat-sen University. He is also a visiting scholar in the Department of Recreation, Sport, and Tourism in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests include consumer behavior and community resilience. He can be contacted at lisheng@illinois.edu

Dr. Zhuowei (Joy) Huang is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Recreation, Sport, and Tourism in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research focuses on consumer behavior in travel and tourism industry and international tourism and hospitality management. She can be contacted at joyhuang@illinois.edu

Abstract (150 Words)

This study proposes and empirically tested the AUIDC framework for tourism advertising effects with five variables: Attention, Utilitarian, Interest, Desire, and Credibility. To examine the tourism advertising effects across different destination types and advertising formats, a 2 (destination type: cultural vs. natural) ×3 (advertising format: VR vs. video vs. print) between-subject experiment was designed and tested. A sample of 307 participants was surveyed in this study. Findings indicate that the tourism advertising effects do not differ across the three ads formats of print, video, and VR. VR is even less effective for destinations primarily featuring natural sceneries. Theoretical and managerial implications of this study are discussed.

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A Study of Tourism Advertising Effects: Advertising Formats and Destination Types

This study proposes and empirically tested the AUIDC framework for tourism advertising effects with five variables: Attention, Utilitarian, Interest, Desire, and Credibility. To examine the tourism advertising effects across different destination types and advertising formats, a 2 (destination type: cultural vs. natural) ×3 (advertising format: VR vs. video vs. print) between-subject experiment was designed and tested. A sample of 307 participants was surveyed in this study. Findings indicate that the tourism advertising effects do not differ across the three ads formats of print, video, and VR. VR is even less effective for destinations primarily featuring natural sceneries. Theoretical and managerial implications of this study are discussed.