Title of Paper

Spatial Effects of Crime on Peer to Peer lodging Performance

Author Information

YUHUA XUFollow

Author Bios (50 Words)

“Melody” Yu-Hua Xu is a Research Assistant in the Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management at the University of Florida. She is now working towards the completion of Ph.D. degree with a focus on destination planning and community resilience. She had participated in a number of projects for destination development plan and facility management in China and the United States. Her research seeks responsive solutions for destinations and communities in face of various disturbance and changes, and provides tools for sustainable development.

Abstract (150 Words)

The study used Spatial Durbin Model (SDM) to examine the total, direct and indirect effects of crimes on peer to peer (P2P) lodging performance in Orlando, Florida. Revenue per available room is used as the proxy for lodging performance. Results showed that the effects of crime are dependent on three factors: crime types, home types, and spatial correlations. The total effect of crime is negative. Among the selected crime types, assault, narcotics and theft show stronger impacts on RevPAR. Entire home contributes to most of the crime effects. We also evidenced the spatial spillover effect in crimes on P2P lodging performance. The spatial dependency of crime effects requires higher level of governance. Response to crime requires individual as well as collective efforts from the community and the destination. Findings of this study also help to extend the discussion of crime theories in tourism fields.

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Spatial Effects of Crime on Peer to Peer lodging Performance

The study used Spatial Durbin Model (SDM) to examine the total, direct and indirect effects of crimes on peer to peer (P2P) lodging performance in Orlando, Florida. Revenue per available room is used as the proxy for lodging performance. Results showed that the effects of crime are dependent on three factors: crime types, home types, and spatial correlations. The total effect of crime is negative. Among the selected crime types, assault, narcotics and theft show stronger impacts on RevPAR. Entire home contributes to most of the crime effects. We also evidenced the spatial spillover effect in crimes on P2P lodging performance. The spatial dependency of crime effects requires higher level of governance. Response to crime requires individual as well as collective efforts from the community and the destination. Findings of this study also help to extend the discussion of crime theories in tourism fields.