Author Information

Ikeji TakahiroFollow

Author Bios (50 Words)

Takahiro Ikeji is a researcher at the Japan Travel Bureau Foundation. It is a think tank in Japan. He provides research and advice to the government and local governments about issues concerning tourism and community development. His research interest includes destination marketing, destination finance, tourism policy, and overtourism.

Abstract (150 Words)

Over the last 10 years, peer-to-peer accommodations have expanded at a significant rate, blurring the difference between them and more traditional accommodations. This study conducts segmentation analysis on non-users of peer-to-peer accommodations to figure out why some people do not even consider using peer-to-peer accommodations. The data is collected from people in 12 countries who indicated their willingness to travel to Japan but unwillingness to use peer-to-peer accommodations, resulting in 2,255 usable samples. The findings suggest that the biggest segment does not have specific concerns, but still do not want to stay in peer-to-peer accommodations. This implies that they do not use it because they do not see the benefits of using it rather than because they are worried about issues such as safety. This study also identifies two other segments of participants: those who have high concerns about language and about safety-related issues (i.e., hygiene, security, and privacy concerns).

Share

COinS
 

Segmentation analysis on non-users of P2P accommodations: Why not use them?

Over the last 10 years, peer-to-peer accommodations have expanded at a significant rate, blurring the difference between them and more traditional accommodations. This study conducts segmentation analysis on non-users of peer-to-peer accommodations to figure out why some people do not even consider using peer-to-peer accommodations. The data is collected from people in 12 countries who indicated their willingness to travel to Japan but unwillingness to use peer-to-peer accommodations, resulting in 2,255 usable samples. The findings suggest that the biggest segment does not have specific concerns, but still do not want to stay in peer-to-peer accommodations. This implies that they do not use it because they do not see the benefits of using it rather than because they are worried about issues such as safety. This study also identifies two other segments of participants: those who have high concerns about language and about safety-related issues (i.e., hygiene, security, and privacy concerns).