Title of Paper

The effect of information intervention on a model of potential visitors’ intentions to avoid visiting volcanic destinations

Author Bios (50 Words)

Mr. Nakamata is a master’s student of Tokyo Metropolitan University, with an educational background in tourism and civil engineering. His research interest relates mainly to experimental investigation of visitors’ evaluations of environments. He is currently interested in the effect of information intervention on human perception of environments.

Dr. Naoi is an associate professor of Tokyo Metropolitan University. He obtained his doctoral degrees from the University of Surrey and Tokyo Institute of Technology. He has studied visitors’ evaluations of destinations, adopting theories and methods of environmental psychology, consumer behavior, and destination image.

Abstract (150 Words)

Using a model based on dual-process theory, this study aims to clarify the effect of information intervention on a model of potential visitors’ intentions to avoid visiting a volcanic destination. News coverage of a volcanic eruption with a photograph is employed as risk-amplifying information, and intervention through information about residents’ lives is assumed to reduce perceived risk. The experimental research results showed that cognitive risk perception had a positive effect on intention to avoid visiting a volcanic destination through negative affective risk perception, and that these three variables were weakened by information intervention. This suggests the usefulness of intervention through information about residents’ everyday lives in minimizing the effect of the risk amplifying information. Nevertheless, the results did not show a significant effect of cognitive risk perception on positive affective risk perception, which may raise questions about the inextricable relationship between risk and destination attractiveness.

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The effect of information intervention on a model of potential visitors’ intentions to avoid visiting volcanic destinations

Using a model based on dual-process theory, this study aims to clarify the effect of information intervention on a model of potential visitors’ intentions to avoid visiting a volcanic destination. News coverage of a volcanic eruption with a photograph is employed as risk-amplifying information, and intervention through information about residents’ lives is assumed to reduce perceived risk. The experimental research results showed that cognitive risk perception had a positive effect on intention to avoid visiting a volcanic destination through negative affective risk perception, and that these three variables were weakened by information intervention. This suggests the usefulness of intervention through information about residents’ everyday lives in minimizing the effect of the risk amplifying information. Nevertheless, the results did not show a significant effect of cognitive risk perception on positive affective risk perception, which may raise questions about the inextricable relationship between risk and destination attractiveness.