Title of Paper

Thriving Habitats: Sustainability in Wildlife Tourism Destinations

Author Bios (50 Words)

Erin Jones is a senior at California State University, Monterey Bay studying Sustainable Ecotourism Management. After graduation in May 2019, she hopes to partner with businesses in their efforts to minimize negative impacts on the environment.

Roberta Atzori is an Assistant Professor at California State University, Monterey Bay, where she teaches and conducts research within the Sustainable Hospitality Management Program. Her research interests include sustainable tourism and hospitality, and climate change mitigation and adaptation in tourism destinations and hospitality businesses.

Angel F. González is an Assistant Professor of Sustainable Hospitality Management at the College of Business at California State University Monterey Bay. His research interests are in the field of travelers’ behaviors and preferences. His educational philosophy includes the development of hospitality leaders with strong entrepreneurship and embracing of sustainability.

Abhijeet Shirsat is an Assistant Professor at California State University, Sacramento. His research is focused on human behavior topics including social media, hospitality, food, and leadership. He intends to build upon the human behavioral studies to identify the problems and challenges of the hospitality industry.

Abstract (150 Words)

In questioning hunting’s effect on tourism, this paper aimed at looking into destinations that host unique animal populations and why their existence is crucial to lasting economic stability in the regions. Several prior research studies have been examined in an effort to understand the different methods that have been recently utilized to protect animal populations and their habitats. Different payment systems, official protected areas, and law enforcement are among the methods examined. Drawing from each of the prior studies examined and incorporating the core principles of ecotourism, recommendations are made on how to ensure that both human and animal populations are considered and supported in their distinct needs. Implementing an ecotourism plan that incorporates education, organizational support, financial benefits, and one that closely monitors the effects of tourism is crucial in protecting people, animals, and the environments they call home.

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Thriving Habitats: Sustainability in Wildlife Tourism Destinations

In questioning hunting’s effect on tourism, this paper aimed at looking into destinations that host unique animal populations and why their existence is crucial to lasting economic stability in the regions. Several prior research studies have been examined in an effort to understand the different methods that have been recently utilized to protect animal populations and their habitats. Different payment systems, official protected areas, and law enforcement are among the methods examined. Drawing from each of the prior studies examined and incorporating the core principles of ecotourism, recommendations are made on how to ensure that both human and animal populations are considered and supported in their distinct needs. Implementing an ecotourism plan that incorporates education, organizational support, financial benefits, and one that closely monitors the effects of tourism is crucial in protecting people, animals, and the environments they call home.