Title of Paper

The experience of stress in communities with high tourism visitation vs low tourism visitation

Author Bios (50 Words)

Casey Moran is a master's student in the School of Community Resources and Development at Arizona State University. Her research addresses improving the quality of life of residents of tourism destinations.

Evan Jordan is an assistant professor in the School of Community Resources and Development at Arizona State University. His research focuses on the impacts of tourism on the experience of stress and emotions by residents of host communities.

Abstract (150 Words)

Stress has recently been discovered as a possible impact of tourism and tourists in host communities. The measurement of tourism related stress has been limited to direct questions about tourism and stress via traditional pen and paper surveys. In this study, we loaded the ArcGIS Survey 123 app on research participant smartphones to collect scale based, open-ended, and geospatial data on stressors in real-time by residents of a community with high levels of tourist visitation (Sedona, AZ) and a community with low levels of tourist visitation (Camp Verde, AZ), with no mention of tourism at any point in the study. Research results showed that residents of Sedona experienced tourism related stress, while residents of Camp Verde did not. In Sedona, tourism related stressors occurred mostly in 'non-tourism' or 'backstage' areas, indicating that the location of tourism and tourists plays an important role in stress experienced by residents.

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The experience of stress in communities with high tourism visitation vs low tourism visitation

Stress has recently been discovered as a possible impact of tourism and tourists in host communities. The measurement of tourism related stress has been limited to direct questions about tourism and stress via traditional pen and paper surveys. In this study, we loaded the ArcGIS Survey 123 app on research participant smartphones to collect scale based, open-ended, and geospatial data on stressors in real-time by residents of a community with high levels of tourist visitation (Sedona, AZ) and a community with low levels of tourist visitation (Camp Verde, AZ), with no mention of tourism at any point in the study. Research results showed that residents of Sedona experienced tourism related stress, while residents of Camp Verde did not. In Sedona, tourism related stressors occurred mostly in 'non-tourism' or 'backstage' areas, indicating that the location of tourism and tourists plays an important role in stress experienced by residents.