Author Bios (50 Words)

Jada Lindblom is third year doctoral candidate in the School of Community Resources and Development at Arizona State University and a research assistant at the ASU Center for Sustainable Tourism. Her current interests focus on the effects of tourism on place identity, pride, and affect in post-war, post-conflict, and post-disaster communities.

Dr. Woojin Lee is Associate Professor in the School of Community Resources and Development at Arizona State University. Dr. Lee is focusing on convention sales and marketing, she also has expertise in examining the impacts of communication technology on online consumer behavior, especially the effects of using social media, and the impact of the sharing economy on tourism industry.

Dr. Christine Vogt is Professor and Director of the Center for Sustainable Tourism in the School of Community Resources & Development at Arizona State University. Dr. Christine Vogt holds a Ph.D. in Leisure Studies. Vogt conducts research in the area of tourism planning; marketing; and community assessment in rural and urban areas.

Kim Pham is a second year Ph.D. student in the School of Community Resources & Development, Arizona State University. Her M.S. degree is in Parks, Recreation and Tourism. Kim worked with travel agents in Vietnam. Her research interests include sustainable tourism practices, destination management, and visitors’ and residents’ perspectives about tourism.

Abstract (150 Words)

This paper investigates how social dimensions may shape the experiences, perceptions, and preferences of winter visitor tourists, also known as “snowbirds.” This research compares members of the two primary snowbird generational cohorts, Baby Boomers and the Silent Generation, to explore possible differences in activity participation, travel party features, and destination satisfaction. Focusing on a popular winter destination in the Southwestern United States, this research integrates two winter visitor samples, one consisting of seasonal residents at recreational vehicle (RV) and mobile home parks, and the other consisting of seasonal homeowners who do not live in an RV or mobile home park environment. The implications of similarities and differences between groups’ activity participation rates, travel party characteristics, and perceived satisfaction with the destination are discussed.

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Flocking Behaviors: The Role of Sociality in the Snowbird Experience

This paper investigates how social dimensions may shape the experiences, perceptions, and preferences of winter visitor tourists, also known as “snowbirds.” This research compares members of the two primary snowbird generational cohorts, Baby Boomers and the Silent Generation, to explore possible differences in activity participation, travel party features, and destination satisfaction. Focusing on a popular winter destination in the Southwestern United States, this research integrates two winter visitor samples, one consisting of seasonal residents at recreational vehicle (RV) and mobile home parks, and the other consisting of seasonal homeowners who do not live in an RV or mobile home park environment. The implications of similarities and differences between groups’ activity participation rates, travel party characteristics, and perceived satisfaction with the destination are discussed.