Title of Paper

Embedding Indigenous Learning Outcomes in a Tourism Curriculum

Author Bios (50 Words)

Dr. Marion Joppe is a Professor in the School of Hospitality, Food and Tourism Management, University of Guelph, Canada. She specializes in destination planning, development and marketing. She has extensive private and public sector experience and continues to be heavily involved in the tourism industry. Marion has a long history of involvement with both the Canada Chapter (former President) and TTRA International. She is currently Chair, TTRA International.

Giannina Veltri has been a professor and coordinator in the Tourism-Travel and Eco-Adventure program at Confederation College in Thunder Bay, ON since 1995. She has completed studies in Reconciliation through Indigenous Education from the University of British Columbia and now is a committee member on CPRIL (Centre for Policy and Research in Indigenous Learning).

Ye (Sandy) Shen is a PhD candidate in the School of Hospitality, Food and Tourism Management, University of Guelph. She received her master’s degree in Human Geography at Peking University and studied tourism management at Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Her research interests include gamification in tourism, tourism experience, and destination marketing.

Abstract (150 Words)

Much has been written on the need to decolonize universities in terms of governance, hirings of staff and faculty, and creating a safe and supportive place for indigenous students to feel welcome. Part of that effort involves indigenizing university curricula. However, little emphasis has been placed in that context on tourism curricula, particularly in business programs, that make little to no room for reflections about different ways of knowing, being and doing. Indigenous culture is treated pretty much like any other product that should be commercialized for the benefits of an ever expanding demand for “authentic” or even “exotic” tourism experiences. This case documents the work at one Canadian College with a two-year Tourism Diploma that has made considerable progress in embedding a series of learning outcomes developed by a group of indigenous leaders in partnership with College leadership. When successfully accomplished, graduates will indeed leave “as global citizens with an understanding of Indigenous worldviews”.

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Embedding Indigenous Learning Outcomes in a Tourism Curriculum

Much has been written on the need to decolonize universities in terms of governance, hirings of staff and faculty, and creating a safe and supportive place for indigenous students to feel welcome. Part of that effort involves indigenizing university curricula. However, little emphasis has been placed in that context on tourism curricula, particularly in business programs, that make little to no room for reflections about different ways of knowing, being and doing. Indigenous culture is treated pretty much like any other product that should be commercialized for the benefits of an ever expanding demand for “authentic” or even “exotic” tourism experiences. This case documents the work at one Canadian College with a two-year Tourism Diploma that has made considerable progress in embedding a series of learning outcomes developed by a group of indigenous leaders in partnership with College leadership. When successfully accomplished, graduates will indeed leave “as global citizens with an understanding of Indigenous worldviews”.