Title of Paper

Risk perception, Olympic Host Image, and Destination Visit Intention: Applying Both Symmetric and Asymmetric Approaches

Presenter Bios (50 Words)

Yeongbae Choe, PhD, is an assistant professor in the international integrated resort management, Faculty of Business Administration, University of Macau. His research focuses on tourism marketing, information technology, and event marketing.

Abstract (150 Words)

Tourist risk perception has been studied extensively in tourism literature and considered an important factor influencing destination choice. However, earlier studies using mostly symmetric approach (e.g., regression, or SEM) cannot accurately analyze the constrain case – i.e., a case having a negative perception but a high visit intention. Therefore, this study utilized both symmetric and asymmetric approaches to understand the relationships among destination-related risk perception (i.e. safety and disease), Olympic host image, attitude, individual characteristics, and visit intention. Results from the two methods are inconsistency. Based on SEM, while attitude, safety, Olympic host city image, past experience, and age were statistically significant, ZIKA perception was not statistically significant. However, in fsQCA results, it influences both the high and low score of visit intention. This study contributes to the existing knowledge of risk perception by applying complexity theory and confirming the diverse effects of safety and disease perception on future behavior intention.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Risk perception, Olympic Host Image, and Destination Visit Intention: Applying Both Symmetric and Asymmetric Approaches

Tourist risk perception has been studied extensively in tourism literature and considered an important factor influencing destination choice. However, earlier studies using mostly symmetric approach (e.g., regression, or SEM) cannot accurately analyze the constrain case – i.e., a case having a negative perception but a high visit intention. Therefore, this study utilized both symmetric and asymmetric approaches to understand the relationships among destination-related risk perception (i.e. safety and disease), Olympic host image, attitude, individual characteristics, and visit intention. Results from the two methods are inconsistency. Based on SEM, while attitude, safety, Olympic host city image, past experience, and age were statistically significant, ZIKA perception was not statistically significant. However, in fsQCA results, it influences both the high and low score of visit intention. This study contributes to the existing knowledge of risk perception by applying complexity theory and confirming the diverse effects of safety and disease perception on future behavior intention.