Author Bios (50 Words)

Jada Lindblom is a Ph.D. candidate in Community Resources and Development at Arizona State University and a research associate with ASU’s Center for Sustainable Tourism. She holds an M.S. degree in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism. Ms. Lindblom conducts research focused on connections between tourism, conservation, resident well-being, and community engagement.

Dr. Christine Vogt is Professor and Director of the Center for Sustainable Tourism in the School of Community Resources & Development at Arizona State University. Vogt holds a Ph.D. in Leisure Studies and conducts research in the areas of tourism planning; marketing; and community assessment in rural and urban areas.

Dr. Kathleen Andereck is Professor in the School of Community Resources & Development at Arizona State University. Andereck holds a Ph.D. in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. Her research focuses on the tourism experience from the perspective of both visitors and residents particularly as it applies to sustainable tourism.

Abstract (150 Words)

This research investigates residents’ perceived senses of pride in a rapidly growing tourism destination that still bears social and geopolitical consequences of war. It considers pride on demographic, attitudinal, and site-based levels, seeking to understand whether pride manifests as self-inflating, as has been proposed in psychology research, rather than as other-distancing or other-devaluing. Neighborhood affiliation is found to yield significant differences in perceived pride as well as other attitudinal variables. Findings suggest that residents’ pride may be significantly influenced by tourism, thus highlighting pride’s inherently social properties and providing support for the claim that pride may be experienced largely in terms of self-inflation. These findings suggest that tourism development in post-war settings may contribute to “authentic” pride within residents, which may have positive psychological benefits and help to unite residents following a period of conflict or division.

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Investigating the Relationship Between Tourism and Residents’ Senses of Pride in an Emergent, Post-War Destination

This research investigates residents’ perceived senses of pride in a rapidly growing tourism destination that still bears social and geopolitical consequences of war. It considers pride on demographic, attitudinal, and site-based levels, seeking to understand whether pride manifests as self-inflating, as has been proposed in psychology research, rather than as other-distancing or other-devaluing. Neighborhood affiliation is found to yield significant differences in perceived pride as well as other attitudinal variables. Findings suggest that residents’ pride may be significantly influenced by tourism, thus highlighting pride’s inherently social properties and providing support for the claim that pride may be experienced largely in terms of self-inflation. These findings suggest that tourism development in post-war settings may contribute to “authentic” pride within residents, which may have positive psychological benefits and help to unite residents following a period of conflict or division.