Title of Paper

Assessing tourism’s well-being effects on community residents

Author Bios (50 Words)

Dr. Kreg Lindberg is an associate professor in the Tourism, Recreation, and Adventure Leadership program at Oregon State University. He focuses on tourism, subjective well-being, and community resilience.

Dr. Ian E. Munanura is an assistant professor in the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society at Oregon State University. He explores the potential of ecotourism to improve the livelihoods of rural communities, which positively impact wildlife in globally valuable forest landscapes.

Dr. Needham is a professor at Oregon State University who examines experiences and behavior within the context of nature, and using this to inform management and advance science. He focuses on forests, wildlife, protected areas, and other recreation, tourism, and natural settings. He is Editor of Human Dimensions of Wildlife.

Abstract (150 Words)

Researchers at the TTRA 2019 conference identified the importance of a holistic perspective on key performance indicators and a research agenda based on “the host comes first.” That orientation is consistent with the increasing literature on subjective well-being (SWB) among residents in destination communities. In assessing the effect of tourism development on resident well-being, previous studies often have utilized diverse SWB measures along with indirect analyses that may constrain conclusions regarding causal relationships.

The present study utilized a direct contingent SWB approach, which is exploratory but provides greater confidence in causal relationships. Results from a general population survey in Oregon (U.S.A.) suggested the method functioned as intended. Consistent with livability theory, the perceived impacts of tourism correlated with change in SWB contingent on a vignette reflecting a 20% increase in tourists. County-level population growth and visitor intensity predicted perceived impacts. Recommendations for destination management and methodological evaluation will be presented.

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Assessing tourism’s well-being effects on community residents

Researchers at the TTRA 2019 conference identified the importance of a holistic perspective on key performance indicators and a research agenda based on “the host comes first.” That orientation is consistent with the increasing literature on subjective well-being (SWB) among residents in destination communities. In assessing the effect of tourism development on resident well-being, previous studies often have utilized diverse SWB measures along with indirect analyses that may constrain conclusions regarding causal relationships.

The present study utilized a direct contingent SWB approach, which is exploratory but provides greater confidence in causal relationships. Results from a general population survey in Oregon (U.S.A.) suggested the method functioned as intended. Consistent with livability theory, the perceived impacts of tourism correlated with change in SWB contingent on a vignette reflecting a 20% increase in tourists. County-level population growth and visitor intensity predicted perceived impacts. Recommendations for destination management and methodological evaluation will be presented.