Title of Paper

Exploring environmentally counterproductive behaviours

Author Bios (50 Words)

Antje Martins is a PhD Candidate and Associate Lecturer in the UQ Business School. Her PhD research focuses on understanding employee non-engagement in sustainability initiatives. As an industry professional turned academic Antje draws upon more than 15 years of international experience in sustainable tourism and hospitality management for her research.

Richard Robinson is an Associate Professor in the UQ Business School. His research projects, often funded by competitive awarding bodies, explore tourism and hospitality workforce policy and planning, skills development, identifying ‘foodies’ consumer behaviours and designing and evaluating education programs. He has published widely across high- ranking journals.

David Solnet is an Associate Professor of Service Management in the UQ Business School. He is recognized internationally for his research, teaching and consulting. His research focuses on service climate, service culture, employee engagement, Generation Y as service workers, and the relationships between management practices, employee attitudes and firm performance.

Abstract (150 Words)

Sustainability initiatives, whilst a prominent feature in hospitality, are predominantly focused on efficiencies and cost reduction rather than integrating social, environmental and economic sustainability. This is challenging. Environmentally, savings potentials are not achieved as initiatives are primarily economically focused. Socially, there is a lack of attention paid to overall employee wellbeing and to understanding employee behaviours towards achieving sustainability goals. Evidence suggests that employee behaviours may not always support organisational sustainability goals however reasons have not been properly investigated. Using the concept of environmentally counterproductive work behaviours (eCWBs) the purpose of this research is thus to understand antecedents of unsustainable behaviours of hospitality employees. The research focuses on housekeepers for two reasons: the high environmental impact of individual employee behaviour and its associated working conditions, including extremely physical and arduous tasks, time pressures, and quality demands.

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Exploring environmentally counterproductive behaviours

Sustainability initiatives, whilst a prominent feature in hospitality, are predominantly focused on efficiencies and cost reduction rather than integrating social, environmental and economic sustainability. This is challenging. Environmentally, savings potentials are not achieved as initiatives are primarily economically focused. Socially, there is a lack of attention paid to overall employee wellbeing and to understanding employee behaviours towards achieving sustainability goals. Evidence suggests that employee behaviours may not always support organisational sustainability goals however reasons have not been properly investigated. Using the concept of environmentally counterproductive work behaviours (eCWBs) the purpose of this research is thus to understand antecedents of unsustainable behaviours of hospitality employees. The research focuses on housekeepers for two reasons: the high environmental impact of individual employee behaviour and its associated working conditions, including extremely physical and arduous tasks, time pressures, and quality demands.