Title of Paper

Mega-sport events’ sport participation legacy & sustainability: a prospective longitudinal case study of an adapted Alpine Sports Tourism Program

Author Bios (50 Words)

Simon Darcy is the Professor for social inclusion at the Department of Management, UTS Business School, University of Technology Sydney.

Tracey Dickson is a Prof at the University of Canberra specialising in tourism and Alpine risk and safety

Abstract (150 Words)

Sport participation legacies are often offered as reasons to host mega sport events, yet there is little evidence to demonstrate the legitimacy of these claims. This prospective longitudinal case study of Whistler Adaptive Sport applied a temporal extension of the socioecological framework to analyze multiple data sources over a decade from before the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games until 2019. The findings reveal the situated and embedded nature of mega sport event legacies that are dependent upon a network of facilitators including local, provincial and federal policies; pre-event and post-event vision and strategies from destination managers, local communities and sport organizations; and volunteers. Together these worked to overcome barriers to participation for PwD by designing, developing and delivering sport opportunities within an Alpine tourism setting. The resulting sport tourism experiences reflected the natural and infrastructure advantage of the community and the accessibility needs of locals and visitors with disability.

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Mega-sport events’ sport participation legacy & sustainability: a prospective longitudinal case study of an adapted Alpine Sports Tourism Program

Sport participation legacies are often offered as reasons to host mega sport events, yet there is little evidence to demonstrate the legitimacy of these claims. This prospective longitudinal case study of Whistler Adaptive Sport applied a temporal extension of the socioecological framework to analyze multiple data sources over a decade from before the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games until 2019. The findings reveal the situated and embedded nature of mega sport event legacies that are dependent upon a network of facilitators including local, provincial and federal policies; pre-event and post-event vision and strategies from destination managers, local communities and sport organizations; and volunteers. Together these worked to overcome barriers to participation for PwD by designing, developing and delivering sport opportunities within an Alpine tourism setting. The resulting sport tourism experiences reflected the natural and infrastructure advantage of the community and the accessibility needs of locals and visitors with disability.