Title of Paper

Developing and Validating a Scale of Perceived Host Territoriality

Author Bios (50 Words)

Yuan Wang, Ph.D. (ywang@dbm.ecnu.edu.cn), is an assistant professor at the Department of Tourism, East China Normal University (Shanghai, China). Yuan’s research interests include peer-to-peer accommodation, destination marketing, and application of social network analysis in tourism.

Xiang (Robert) Li, Ph.D. (robertli@temple.edu), is a professor and Washburn Senior Research Fellow at the Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Temple University. He is also Director of Temple’s U.S.-Asia Tourism & Hospitality Research Center. Robert's research mainly focuses on destination marketing and tourist behavior, with special emphasis on international destination branding, customer loyalty, and tourism in Asia. Robert's research findings have appeared in numerous top-tier tourism, business, leisure, and hospitality journals.

Abstract (150 Words)

Human territoriality is a highly relevant topic in P2P accommodation studies. This paper aims to develop and validate a scale of host territoriality from the perspective of P2P accommodation guests. Five studies with diverse data sources were conducted sequentially following best practices in the scale development procedure. The proposed scale of perceived host territoriality, which consisted of 18 items and four dimensions, namely accessibility, house rules, signs of ownership, and intrusion, demonstrated good reliability and validity. Findings of this paper can facilitate empirical examinations of host territoriality in P2P accommodation settings and shed light on the conceptualization of human territoriality in tourism and hospitality fields.

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Developing and Validating a Scale of Perceived Host Territoriality

Human territoriality is a highly relevant topic in P2P accommodation studies. This paper aims to develop and validate a scale of host territoriality from the perspective of P2P accommodation guests. Five studies with diverse data sources were conducted sequentially following best practices in the scale development procedure. The proposed scale of perceived host territoriality, which consisted of 18 items and four dimensions, namely accessibility, house rules, signs of ownership, and intrusion, demonstrated good reliability and validity. Findings of this paper can facilitate empirical examinations of host territoriality in P2P accommodation settings and shed light on the conceptualization of human territoriality in tourism and hospitality fields.