Title of Paper

Examining the Relationship between Practicing Savoring Strategies on Vacation-Taking and Quality of Life

Author Bios (50 Words)

1. Nanxi Yan, PhD candidate from the University of Alberta. Her research interests including tourist behavior, travel experience, positive emotion, emotion regulation, and quality of life.

2. Elizabeth Halpenny, PhD, teaches and conducts research in the areas of tourism, marketing, environmental psychology and protected areas management. Elizabeth’s research focuses on individuals interactions with nature environments, tourism experience, and environmental stewardship. Current research projects include: (a) the effect of mobile digital technologies on visitors’ experiences: (b) the impact of World Heritage designation and other park-related brands on travel decision making; (c) individuals’ attitudes towards and stewardship of natural areas; and (d) children, health and nature.

Abstract (150 Words)

Current research on tourists’ quality of life (QOL) suggests that the positive influences contributed by vacation-taking tend to be short-lived. However, it is possible that practicing savoring strategies in response to vacation-taking experiences may enhance the relationship between vacation-taking and QOL. Thus, this research aims to investigate whether types of savoring strategies or frequencies of practicing savoring strategies could moderate the relationship between vacation-taking and quality of life (i.e., both hedonic and eudaimonic well-being). To do this, we conducted a longitudinal research. We asked university students who are going to Reading Weeks (i.e., at least 3 nights, for the purpose of leisure) to complete three online surveys about their quality of life level (i.e., subjective well-being, psychological flourishing) and types and frequencies of practising savoring strategies at three different time point: 2 weeks before, at the end of, and 2 weeks post the end of Reading Week. Our data collection will be completed at the beginning of March, 2020. So, we will be able to present the results at the conference.

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Examining the Relationship between Practicing Savoring Strategies on Vacation-Taking and Quality of Life

Current research on tourists’ quality of life (QOL) suggests that the positive influences contributed by vacation-taking tend to be short-lived. However, it is possible that practicing savoring strategies in response to vacation-taking experiences may enhance the relationship between vacation-taking and QOL. Thus, this research aims to investigate whether types of savoring strategies or frequencies of practicing savoring strategies could moderate the relationship between vacation-taking and quality of life (i.e., both hedonic and eudaimonic well-being). To do this, we conducted a longitudinal research. We asked university students who are going to Reading Weeks (i.e., at least 3 nights, for the purpose of leisure) to complete three online surveys about their quality of life level (i.e., subjective well-being, psychological flourishing) and types and frequencies of practising savoring strategies at three different time point: 2 weeks before, at the end of, and 2 weeks post the end of Reading Week. Our data collection will be completed at the beginning of March, 2020. So, we will be able to present the results at the conference.