Author Bios (50 Words)

Connor Clark is a second-year PhD student at Arizona State University. His principle research focus is on how communities can create social, cultural, health, and economic benefits through protecting natural and cultural resources. His research interests include sustainable tourism development, natural resource management, nature-based tourism, economic empowerment, and community resilience.

Gyan Nyaupane is a professor at Arizona State University. He has extensive research experience in the fields of parks and public lands, planning and policy, and sustainable/eco/heritage tourism. Dr. Nyaupane’s research interests include understanding human-environment interactions, sustainable communities, resilience, indigeneity, nature-based tourism, and policy and planning.

Andrea Lichterman graduated from Arizona State University with a Bachelor of Science in Sustainable Tourism from the School of Community Resources and Development in 2017. Her research involved identifying millennials and understanding their participation in outdoor recreation in regard to their use of technology.

Abstract (150 Words)

Abstract: This mixed methods study compares perceptions of millennials and nature-based tourism providers towards technology use in nature-based settings. A survey of 276 millennials and public sector nature-based providers was conducted. Survey data were analyzed to compare between millennials and providers using an independent sample t-test. A focus group of millennials was also conducted to obtain rich qualitative data about millennials’ views towards using technology while recreating outdoors. The results show that both providers and millennials perceived that the use of digital cameras, GPS and video cameras enhance experiences, while the use of drones, talking on a cell phone and virtual reality technologies diminish experiences. Further, the results reveal that millennials perceived the use of augmented reality, Wi-Fi, and laptop in nature-based settings more negatively, while the use of drones and music listening devices more positively than the providers did. This discrepancy between millennials and nature-based tourism providers is discussed.

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Millennials’ Use of Technology in Nature-based Settings: Understanding Value Discrepancy with an Integrative Approach to Technology Acceptance and Attention Restoration Theory

Abstract: This mixed methods study compares perceptions of millennials and nature-based tourism providers towards technology use in nature-based settings. A survey of 276 millennials and public sector nature-based providers was conducted. Survey data were analyzed to compare between millennials and providers using an independent sample t-test. A focus group of millennials was also conducted to obtain rich qualitative data about millennials’ views towards using technology while recreating outdoors. The results show that both providers and millennials perceived that the use of digital cameras, GPS and video cameras enhance experiences, while the use of drones, talking on a cell phone and virtual reality technologies diminish experiences. Further, the results reveal that millennials perceived the use of augmented reality, Wi-Fi, and laptop in nature-based settings more negatively, while the use of drones and music listening devices more positively than the providers did. This discrepancy between millennials and nature-based tourism providers is discussed.