Author Bios (50 Words)

Ulrike Kachel, PhD, is a Lecturer in Management and Marketing at Charles Darwin University, Australia. She has a strong professional background in both the information technology (IT) and tourism sectors. Ulrike’s research interests include sustainable tourism management and marketing, consumer behaviour, climate change, animal ethics, as well as higher education research.

Gayle Jennings, PhD, is a qualitative research and research writing consultant. She is also an Adjunct Professor of Tourism Management, Department of Tourism, Sport and Hotel Management, at Griffith University. Her writing focusses on theoretical research paradigms, qualitative research, qualitative methodologies and methods, and, ‘becoming’ and ‘being’ qualitative researcher.

Abstract (150 Words)

Qualitative data analysis can be a daunting task, especially for novice researchers, and there is no one way to approach this as research topics and approaches are multiple and diverse. Over recent decades, qualitative data analysis software (QDAS) such as NVivo or Leximancer have been developed to support researchers with this task. However, different software tools provide different functionalities and, at times, may limit empirical material/data analysis or can be difficult to learn in the first place. Further, utilising grounded theory with its different coding phases can add another challenge for novice researchers. This paper presents a reflection by a novice researcher on exploring different tools for qualitative empirical material analysis and an illustration of using a mind mapping software to refine concepts and codes within a grounded theory research project. By sharing this research experience, it is hoped to provide other (novice) researchers with insights into how to creatively approach research challenges and how mind maps can be used in new ways as a research tool.

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A reflection on using mind maps as a tool for grounded theory analysis

Qualitative data analysis can be a daunting task, especially for novice researchers, and there is no one way to approach this as research topics and approaches are multiple and diverse. Over recent decades, qualitative data analysis software (QDAS) such as NVivo or Leximancer have been developed to support researchers with this task. However, different software tools provide different functionalities and, at times, may limit empirical material/data analysis or can be difficult to learn in the first place. Further, utilising grounded theory with its different coding phases can add another challenge for novice researchers. This paper presents a reflection by a novice researcher on exploring different tools for qualitative empirical material analysis and an illustration of using a mind mapping software to refine concepts and codes within a grounded theory research project. By sharing this research experience, it is hoped to provide other (novice) researchers with insights into how to creatively approach research challenges and how mind maps can be used in new ways as a research tool.