Title of Paper

Black travel is not a monolith

Author Bios (50 Words for each Author)

Alana Dillette, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Payne School of Hospitality and Tourism Management as well as the Co-Director for Tourism RESET, an initiative focused on race, ethnicity and social equity in tourism. Dr. Dillette also serves as a liaison for diversity initiatives in the College of Professional Studies and Fine Arts. Originally from the islands of The Bahamas, Dr. Dillette conducts research that explores the intersection between tourism, race, gender & ethnicity. More specifically, she is working on research to gain a better understanding of the Black travel experience in addition to the challenges faced by Black hospitality and tourism professionals.

Stefanie Benjamin, Ph.D., CHE is an Assistant Professor in the Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management department at the University of Tennessee and the Co-Director of Tourism RESET. Her research interests include social equity in tourism around the intersectionality of race, gender, sexual orientation, and people with disabilities. She also researches film-induced tourism, implements improvisational theater games as innovative pedagogy, and is a certified qualitative researcher exploring ethnography, visual methodology, and social media analysis. Lastly, she serves as a Faculty Advisor on the Equity and Diversity Board for the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Diversity & Engagement.

Abstract (150 Words)

Sparked by the viral video showing the murder of George Floyd, the Black Lives Matter Movement had taken to the streets before but never to this magnitude, nor intensity. Additionally numerous corporations, institutions, and businesses showed solidarity with the movement. These discussions permeated throughout travel and tourism both in the industry and in academia. As a response to the numerous calls for action, and to keep an authentic conversation about Black lives in the travel space - the goal of this presentation is to take a deeper look into the nexus and intersectionalities of Black travelers and how their experiences in the tourism landscape both collide and diverge from each other. Adopting a counter-storytelling approach from CRT, we wanted to glean insight into the ways in which Black travelers have been included, or excluded, within the travel and tourism industry and how the different facets of their identities have informed these experiences.

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Black travel is not a monolith

Sparked by the viral video showing the murder of George Floyd, the Black Lives Matter Movement had taken to the streets before but never to this magnitude, nor intensity. Additionally numerous corporations, institutions, and businesses showed solidarity with the movement. These discussions permeated throughout travel and tourism both in the industry and in academia. As a response to the numerous calls for action, and to keep an authentic conversation about Black lives in the travel space - the goal of this presentation is to take a deeper look into the nexus and intersectionalities of Black travelers and how their experiences in the tourism landscape both collide and diverge from each other. Adopting a counter-storytelling approach from CRT, we wanted to glean insight into the ways in which Black travelers have been included, or excluded, within the travel and tourism industry and how the different facets of their identities have informed these experiences.