Event Title

Session A1 - Status and Overview of Federal Interagency East Coast Fish Passage Manual

Presenter Information

James Turek, NOAA

Location

UMass Amherst

Event Website

http://fishpassage.ecs.umass.edu/Conference2012/

Start Date

5-6-2012 11:30 AM

End Date

5-6-2012 12:00 PM

Description

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) established a Memorandum of Agreement with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 2009 (and later joined by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in 2010) to collaboratively prepare a guidance manual and develop passage design criteria for 15 East Coast diadromous fish species. A primary focus of the document is to provide non-prescriptive passage criteria based on the biology of each species (such as timing of East Coast runs and general species habitat requirements), and the swimming performance, leaping capability, and behavioral challenges of each species, based on field (telemetry) and laboratory (flume and/or respirometer experiments) studies, and as documented in published literature. The passage criteria are expected to be applied in the design of a variety of fish passage types. The document describes the fish passage types with a greater emphasis on dam removals and nature-like fishways, and to a lesser extent, structural fishways, culverts and tide gates. Information is also included on engineering considerations (e.g., weir and notch design) relative to fish passage and in particular, to dam removals and nature-like fishway design. Manual chapters also address topics of hydrology, and specifically calculating flows for the target species run period, and hydraulics such as streaming versus plunging flows, head-velocity relationships, and energy dissipation. A manual chapter is dedicated to passage evaluation and monitoring with a primary focus on biological monitoring, although we also present a step-by-step, physical assessment survey protocol that can be used by fish passage practitioners as a diagnostic tool to evaluate physical conditions at nature-like fishway sites, certain dam removal sites, and possibly other passageways. Case study site examples from the Northeast, with site descriptions and results of diagnostic physical evaluations, are included as an appendix in the document along with other appendices such as species profile summaries and a glossary of terms. The manual is expected to be available to the public as a web-based document that can be periodically updated as new information is gained from science-based studies and advances in engineering and technology.

Comments

James Turek is Assistant Northeast Team Leader with the NOAA Fisheries Restoration Center (13 years). He is responsible for managing or providing technical assistance on an array of Northeast coastal habitat restoration projects in Narragansett Bay, Long Island Sound, Buzzards Bay and their watersheds, and elsewhere. He has 27 years of experience in fishery biology and wetlands ecology, and his experience includes the planning, design, construction and monitoring of fish passage and wetland restoration and creation sites. He holds a Bachelor's Degree in Zoology and minor in Geological Sciences from the University of Maine at Orono, and a Master's Degree in Marine Affairs from the University of Rhode Island. He is passionate about flyfishing, mineral collecting and other outdoor recreation and travel.

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Jun 5th, 11:30 AM Jun 5th, 12:00 PM

Session A1 - Status and Overview of Federal Interagency East Coast Fish Passage Manual

UMass Amherst

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) established a Memorandum of Agreement with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 2009 (and later joined by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in 2010) to collaboratively prepare a guidance manual and develop passage design criteria for 15 East Coast diadromous fish species. A primary focus of the document is to provide non-prescriptive passage criteria based on the biology of each species (such as timing of East Coast runs and general species habitat requirements), and the swimming performance, leaping capability, and behavioral challenges of each species, based on field (telemetry) and laboratory (flume and/or respirometer experiments) studies, and as documented in published literature. The passage criteria are expected to be applied in the design of a variety of fish passage types. The document describes the fish passage types with a greater emphasis on dam removals and nature-like fishways, and to a lesser extent, structural fishways, culverts and tide gates. Information is also included on engineering considerations (e.g., weir and notch design) relative to fish passage and in particular, to dam removals and nature-like fishway design. Manual chapters also address topics of hydrology, and specifically calculating flows for the target species run period, and hydraulics such as streaming versus plunging flows, head-velocity relationships, and energy dissipation. A manual chapter is dedicated to passage evaluation and monitoring with a primary focus on biological monitoring, although we also present a step-by-step, physical assessment survey protocol that can be used by fish passage practitioners as a diagnostic tool to evaluate physical conditions at nature-like fishway sites, certain dam removal sites, and possibly other passageways. Case study site examples from the Northeast, with site descriptions and results of diagnostic physical evaluations, are included as an appendix in the document along with other appendices such as species profile summaries and a glossary of terms. The manual is expected to be available to the public as a web-based document that can be periodically updated as new information is gained from science-based studies and advances in engineering and technology.

http://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2012/June5/16