Event Title

Session A1 - Fish Passage in the Salmonid-free Southeast and Gulf of Mexico: History, Ecological Benefits, Challenges and Future Directions

Location

UMass Amherst

Event Website

http://fishpassage.ecs.umass.edu/Conference2012/

Start Date

5-6-2012 10:30 AM

End Date

5-6-2012 10:50 AM

Description

Recognition of ecological benefits of ocean-river migratory fishes and restoration of historical spawning habitats is an important focus for marine, estuarine, and river ecosystems and fisheries of the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast rivers of North America. We review a brief history of the region's ocean-river fisheries, historical fishways, and the decline of fish populations and river fisheries in the 20th Century. In an effort to rectify poor performance of fish passage in the Southeast NOAA Fisheries is developing an Atlantic and Gulf Fish Passage Design Primer to support public awareness of the importance of restoration for ocean-river migratory fish and future directions. The primer is planned for publication in June 2012 and developed in collaboration with U.S. Geological Survey Conte Anadromous Fishery Research Laboratory, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Fish Passage Team.

Comments

Prescott Brownell is currently the NMFS Southeast Region Coordinator for hydropower licensing and fish passage restoration, based in the South Atlantic Branch, Habitat Conservation Division, in Charleston, South Caroliina. He received his education in fishery science at N.C. State University in the 1965-70, and during his career has worked with South Carolina Wildlife and Marine Resources Department, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as Chief of the Division of Ecological Services, Atlanta, and the National Marine Fisheries Service.

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Jun 5th, 10:30 AM Jun 5th, 10:50 AM

Session A1 - Fish Passage in the Salmonid-free Southeast and Gulf of Mexico: History, Ecological Benefits, Challenges and Future Directions

UMass Amherst

Recognition of ecological benefits of ocean-river migratory fishes and restoration of historical spawning habitats is an important focus for marine, estuarine, and river ecosystems and fisheries of the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast rivers of North America. We review a brief history of the region's ocean-river fisheries, historical fishways, and the decline of fish populations and river fisheries in the 20th Century. In an effort to rectify poor performance of fish passage in the Southeast NOAA Fisheries is developing an Atlantic and Gulf Fish Passage Design Primer to support public awareness of the importance of restoration for ocean-river migratory fish and future directions. The primer is planned for publication in June 2012 and developed in collaboration with U.S. Geological Survey Conte Anadromous Fishery Research Laboratory, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Fish Passage Team.

http://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2012/June5/4