Off-campus UMass Amherst users: To download campus access dissertations, please use the following link to log into our proxy server with your UMass Amherst user name and password.

Non-UMass Amherst users: Please talk to your librarian about requesting this dissertation through interlibrary loan.

Dissertations that have an embargo placed on them will not be available to anyone until the embargo expires.

Author ORCID Identifier

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6680-7347

AccessType

Campus-Only Access for Five (5) Years

Document Type

dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Degree Program

Polymer Science and Engineering

Year Degree Awarded

2022

Month Degree Awarded

May

First Advisor

Thomas P Russell

Subject Categories

Biological and Chemical Physics | Materials Chemistry | Organic Chemistry | Polymer and Organic Materials | Polymer Chemistry | Semiconductor and Optical Materials

Abstract

Due to the promising application of clean and renewable energy sources, thin-film solar cells have attracted much attention. To date, encouraging efficiencies of 19% for organic solar cells have been achieved, benefiting from the development of materials and the control of solid-state behavior. However, relative to the rapid growth of device performance, the development of device stability has lagged, making them still far from being commercially available.

My thesis is to investigate the impact of solid-state behavior related to device performance and stability of organic solar cells. Chapter 1 introduces the background, methods, and progress of the organic solar cells. Chapter 2 describes modified ZnO nanoparticles as electron transport layer to improve the performance and stability of organic solar cells. Chapter 3 describes the structure and property relationship of some non-fullerene acceptors for organic solar cells. Chapter 4 describes morphological studies of non-fullerene acceptor-based organic photovoltaic active layers by X-ray scattering and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. Chapter 5 describes the use of X-ray scattering and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance to understand the morphology degradation of non-fullerene acceptor-based organic photovoltaic active layers.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.7275/28638785

Available for download on Saturday, May 13, 2023

Share

COinS