Event Title

Session C5- Fish passage on the Susquehanna River at the Sunbury inflatable dam

Location

UMass Amherst

Start Date

28-6-2011 1:35 PM

End Date

28-6-2011 1:55 PM

Description

An inflatable dam, owned and operated by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR), was constructed across the Susquehanna River in the late 1960s near the City of Sunbury. The dam consists of seven eight-foot-highinflatable bags totaling 2,100 feet in length, making it the longest inflatable dam in the world. The dam is typically inflated in mid-May and deflated in early October. During this period the inflatable dam prevents the upstream migration of anadromous fish. A condition of the original dam permit issued in 1966 was that fish passage be provided once successful fish passage is obtained at the four downstream hydroelectric dams. Since 1970, the downstream restoration efforts have showed great promise in restoring the migratory fish patterns of the river. Consequently, the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) is now requesting that fish passage be provided. In 2001, DCNR authorized Gannett Fleming to evaluate and design a fish passage facility located at the east abutment of the dam. This design took the form of a serpentine vertical-slot fish way. The vertical-slot fish way project was bid in 2004. However, due to market conditions and other factors, the construction of the serpentine vertical-slot fishway was postponed. In 2007, the possibility of providing effective fish passage at the west abutment of the dam was investigated. The topography of the west abutment was found to be favorable to support a “nature-like” by-pass channel fish way. The facility consists of fifteen pool and weir structures and the design allows for fish passage during all times of the year. This presentation presents the author’s experience related to providing fish passage at the inflatable dam in Sunbury. The unique history of the site and key design considerations are discussed. The presentation will focus on the nature-like fish way which is proposed for the west abutment.

Comments

Mr. Eric Neast graduated from The Pennsylvania State University in 1989 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering with an emphasis on hydrology and hydraulics. Since joining the firm of Gannett Fleming Inc. in January of 1990, Mr. Neast has been involved in a wide range of projects with a focus on erosion control and storm water management, including green infrastructure and low impact development. In 2000, Mr. Neast joined the Dams and Hydraulics Division of Gannett Fleming. His experience includes numerous dam rehabilitation designs, many of which included fish passage. Mr. Neast was also involved with overseeing construction of two Denil fish passage structures on the Schuylkill River in Pennsylvania and the development of a fishing wharf and other recreational enhancements along the Susquehanna River at the Conowingo Dam in Maryland.

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Jun 28th, 1:35 PM Jun 28th, 1:55 PM

Session C5- Fish passage on the Susquehanna River at the Sunbury inflatable dam

UMass Amherst

An inflatable dam, owned and operated by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR), was constructed across the Susquehanna River in the late 1960s near the City of Sunbury. The dam consists of seven eight-foot-highinflatable bags totaling 2,100 feet in length, making it the longest inflatable dam in the world. The dam is typically inflated in mid-May and deflated in early October. During this period the inflatable dam prevents the upstream migration of anadromous fish. A condition of the original dam permit issued in 1966 was that fish passage be provided once successful fish passage is obtained at the four downstream hydroelectric dams. Since 1970, the downstream restoration efforts have showed great promise in restoring the migratory fish patterns of the river. Consequently, the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) is now requesting that fish passage be provided. In 2001, DCNR authorized Gannett Fleming to evaluate and design a fish passage facility located at the east abutment of the dam. This design took the form of a serpentine vertical-slot fish way. The vertical-slot fish way project was bid in 2004. However, due to market conditions and other factors, the construction of the serpentine vertical-slot fishway was postponed. In 2007, the possibility of providing effective fish passage at the west abutment of the dam was investigated. The topography of the west abutment was found to be favorable to support a “nature-like” by-pass channel fish way. The facility consists of fifteen pool and weir structures and the design allows for fish passage during all times of the year. This presentation presents the author’s experience related to providing fish passage at the inflatable dam in Sunbury. The unique history of the site and key design considerations are discussed. The presentation will focus on the nature-like fish way which is proposed for the west abutment.