Event Title

Concurrent Sessions C: A Cooperative Approach to Solving Fish Habitat Recovery - Fish Barriers to Protect Native Cutthroat Trout

Presenter Information

Dale White, Gallatin National Forest

Location

Oregon State University

Start Date

27-6-2013 4:30 PM

End Date

27-6-2013 4:50 PM

Description

Use of man-made fish barriers to prevent upstream invasion of undesirable aquatic species has increased dramatically over the last decade. In Montana, fish barriers are now an accepted tool in the toolbox of managers tasked with securing native Yellowstone and west slope cutthroat trout populations from nonnative brook, brown, and rainbow trout which out compete, prey on, and hybridize with native fish. Successes and failures of past fish barrier projects to withstand flood events and exclude target species have resulted in design refinements which are currently being utilized and critiqued. Future designs will be driven by the intersection of site specific design and logistical challenges, new native species management objectives requiring temporary barriers or selective passage, technological advancements such as electric barriers, target species swimming performance data, and economics.

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Jun 27th, 4:30 PM Jun 27th, 4:50 PM

Concurrent Sessions C: A Cooperative Approach to Solving Fish Habitat Recovery - Fish Barriers to Protect Native Cutthroat Trout

Oregon State University

Use of man-made fish barriers to prevent upstream invasion of undesirable aquatic species has increased dramatically over the last decade. In Montana, fish barriers are now an accepted tool in the toolbox of managers tasked with securing native Yellowstone and west slope cutthroat trout populations from nonnative brook, brown, and rainbow trout which out compete, prey on, and hybridize with native fish. Successes and failures of past fish barrier projects to withstand flood events and exclude target species have resulted in design refinements which are currently being utilized and critiqued. Future designs will be driven by the intersection of site specific design and logistical challenges, new native species management objectives requiring temporary barriers or selective passage, technological advancements such as electric barriers, target species swimming performance data, and economics.