Event Title

Session C1: Supporting Decision-Making for Improving Longitudinal Connectivity for Diadromous and Potamodromous Fishes in Complex Catchments

Location

Groningen, The Netherlands

Event Website

http://fishpassage.umass.edu/

Start Date

22-6-2015 11:40 AM

End Date

22-6-2015 11:55 AM

Description

Abstract:

Preservation and restoration of Europe's endangered migratory fish species and habitats are high on the international river basin policy agenda. Improvement through restoration of longitudinal connectivity is seen as an important measure, but although prioritization of in-stream barriers has been addressed at local and regional levels the process still lacks adequate priority on the international level. This paper introduces a well-tested method, designed to help decision makers achieve the rehabilitation of targeted ichthyofauna more successfully. This method assesses artificial barriers within waters designated under the Water Framework Directive (WFD), Europe's main legislative driver for ecological improvement of river basins. The method aggregates migratory fish communities (both diadromous and potamodromous) into functional biological units (ecological fish guilds) and defines their most pressing habitat requirements. Using GIS mapping and spatial analysis of the potential ranges (fish zonation) we pin-point the most important barriers, per guild. This method was developed and deployed over a 12 year period as a practical case study, fitting data derived from the 36 regional water management organisations in the Netherlands. We delivered national advice on the prioritization of a total of 2924 barriers located within WFD water bodies, facilitating migration for all 18 indigenous migratory fish species.

Comments

Presenting Author Bio: Niels is senior Project Manager at the Royal Dutch Angling Organisation (Sportvisserij Nederland). On the theme of fish migration he joined forces with the World Fish Migration Day and cooperated in the Living North Sea Programme. Niels published several fish-migrating related studies e.g. on tracking the highly endangered European sturgeon (Acipenser sturio) in the river Rhine and North Sea and on the downstream migration and mortality of Atlantic salmon smolts in the river Meuse. The article of this oral presentation (improving longitudinal connectivity in complex catchments) is build on 13 years of experience in the Netherlands.

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Jun 22nd, 11:40 AM Jun 22nd, 11:55 AM

Session C1: Supporting Decision-Making for Improving Longitudinal Connectivity for Diadromous and Potamodromous Fishes in Complex Catchments

Groningen, The Netherlands

Abstract:

Preservation and restoration of Europe's endangered migratory fish species and habitats are high on the international river basin policy agenda. Improvement through restoration of longitudinal connectivity is seen as an important measure, but although prioritization of in-stream barriers has been addressed at local and regional levels the process still lacks adequate priority on the international level. This paper introduces a well-tested method, designed to help decision makers achieve the rehabilitation of targeted ichthyofauna more successfully. This method assesses artificial barriers within waters designated under the Water Framework Directive (WFD), Europe's main legislative driver for ecological improvement of river basins. The method aggregates migratory fish communities (both diadromous and potamodromous) into functional biological units (ecological fish guilds) and defines their most pressing habitat requirements. Using GIS mapping and spatial analysis of the potential ranges (fish zonation) we pin-point the most important barriers, per guild. This method was developed and deployed over a 12 year period as a practical case study, fitting data derived from the 36 regional water management organisations in the Netherlands. We delivered national advice on the prioritization of a total of 2924 barriers located within WFD water bodies, facilitating migration for all 18 indigenous migratory fish species.

https://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2015/June22/11