Workshop Format// Formats des Ateliers

Panel/Présentations avec discussion du panel

Title// Titre

Panel 11 Reading Rural Landscapes as Heritage

DOI

https://doi.org/10.7275/0bx7-1p73

Biographical Information // Informations biographiques

Lionella Scazzosi, PhD, is an Architect and Full Professor at the Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Scazzosi has many designations including: author, consultant for the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Landscape for landscape policies; Council of Europe expert for the implementation of the European Landscape Convention; member of the ICOMOS-IFLA International Scientific Committee on Cultural Landscapes (ISCCL) and voting member for Italy; convener of the ISCCL World Rural Landscape Initiative and the ICOMOS Doctrinal Text “Principles on Rural Landscapes as Heritage”; and scientific director of national and international research on landscape preservation and management, and landscape enhancement policies and cultures.

Raffaella Laviscio, Architect, Phd, is an adjunct professor at Politecnico di Milano (Italy) where she carries out research on the protection and enhancement of cultural heritage and landscape in the context of national and international research programs. She is a member of ICOMOS Italia and the ISCCL and responsible for the scientific and organizational secretariat of the "World Rural Landscape Initiative". She is an expert member of several Landscape Commissions in Milan metropolitan area. She has participated in national and international conferences on the theme of cultural heritage and landscape. She is author of publications on the issues of knowledge and evaluation of cultural heritage.

Pierre Marie Tricaud, PhD, agronomist, landscape architect, urban planner and former president of French IFLA. He works with the Greater Paris planning institute on open spaces studies, strategic plans, natural parks, and local projects in the Paris region and at the international level (Morocco, Libya, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Cambodia, Vietnam). Tricaud also carries out expert missions on World Heritage cultural landscapes. His interest and expertise include the cultural, natural, landscape and historical values of changing urban, rural and natural sites in the context of their planning, and searching for new uses of heritage elements, beyond their mere preservation.

Steve Brown is an Honorary Associate with the Museum and Heritage Studies Program at the University of Sydney and a Lecturer at the University of Canberra, Australia. His research interests include the integration of NatureCulture in heritage management. He is a co-editor of Cultural and Spiritual Significance of Nature in Protected Areas: Governance, Management and Policy (2018) and former President of the ICOMOS-IFLA International Scientific Committee on Cultural Landscapes (ISCCL)

Cari Goetcheus is an Associate Professor in the College of Environment and Design (CED) at the University of Georgia (UGA). Cari’s expertise lies in cultural landscape research, documentation and management. Her research interests include landscape preservation education, vernacular and ethnographic land use history, and heritage management. Goetcheus is the Director of the UGA CED Cultural Landscape Lab, and currently co-authoring with Steve Brown the Routledge Handbook on Cultural Landscape Practice.

Keywords

Cultural Landscapes, rural heritage, rural landscapes, World Heritage, legibility

Abstract // Résumé

The workshop will provide an overview of methods and tools necessary for the identification, documentation and interpretation of rural landscapes, as articulated in the ICOMOS-IFLA Principles Concerning Rural Landscapes as Heritage. Three short presentations will be followed by 30 minutes of discussion.

Paper 11.1: Rural landscapes and the World Heritage List. This presentation provides a preliminary overview of a research project to identify and document rural landscapes within the 1,121 properties inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List. The presentation highlights some issues including: contradictions among the range of protection mechanisms; matters related to the separation of cultural and natural heritage; and challenges in engaging local communities.

Paper 11.2: The inventory and mapping of rural landscapes. This presentation provides an update on the ICOMOS-IFLA ISCCL World Rural Landscape Initiative (WRLI) (www.worldrurallandscapes.org). The WRLI components (Principles, Atlas, Glossary, Bibliography) reveal the methods and processes relevant to the inventory, classification and interpretation of rural landscapes, both outstanding and ordinary or representative landscapes. Although complicated and challenging, local application of the methods and processes are necessary for World Heritage management regimes.

Paper 11.3: The need for diverse lenses to support rural landscape heritage. The ICOMOS-IFLA 2017 Principles provide a comprehensive outline of the fields and work required to better recognize and safeguard rural landscape heritage. This presentation will consider the scope of disciplinary expertise required to apply the Principles and outline some of the ways that diverse disciplines can best work together to achieve the aspirational goals stated in the Principles document.

Bibliographic References // Références Bibliographiques

Kalman, H. (2014). Heritage Planning: Principles and Process. Abingdon-on-Thames, UK: Routledge

Laviscio, R. (2018). Knowledge of Rural Landscape systems: an international proposal for a classification, In: Rosina,E., Scazzosi, L. (eds.), The Conservation and enhancement of Built and Landscape Heritage (pp. 55-66). Milan, Italy: PoliScript, Politecnico di Milano. ISBN: 978-88-6493-039-8 (https://re.public.polimi.it/retrieve/handle/11311/1050122/275347/Pubblicazione%20Mondonico_290318_DEF-compressed.pdf)

Rössler, M. (2003). Linking Nature and Culture: World Heritage Cultural Landscapes. In UNESCO World Heritage Centre, Cultural Landscapes: the Challenge of Conservation, World Heritage Papers, n. 7 (pp. 10-15). Paris, France: UNESCO World Heritage Centre

Scazzosi, L. (2018). Landscapes as systems of tangible and intangible relationships. Small theoretical and methodological introduction to read and evaluate Rural Landscapes as Heritage, In: Rosina,E., Scazzosi, L. (eds.), The Conservation and enhancement of Built and Landscape Heritage (pp. 19-40). Milan, Italy: PoliScript, Politecnico di Milano. ISBN: 978-88-6493-039-8 (https://re.public.polimi.it/retrieve/handle/11311/1050122/275347/Pubblicazione%20Mondonico_290318_DEF-compressed.pdf)

Tricaud, P.M (2013). Agricultural landscapes in a world heritage context, World Heritage, 69, 60–62

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Panel 11 Reading Rural Landscapes as Heritage

The workshop will provide an overview of methods and tools necessary for the identification, documentation and interpretation of rural landscapes, as articulated in the ICOMOS-IFLA Principles Concerning Rural Landscapes as Heritage. Three short presentations will be followed by 30 minutes of discussion.

Paper 11.1: Rural landscapes and the World Heritage List. This presentation provides a preliminary overview of a research project to identify and document rural landscapes within the 1,121 properties inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List. The presentation highlights some issues including: contradictions among the range of protection mechanisms; matters related to the separation of cultural and natural heritage; and challenges in engaging local communities.

Paper 11.2: The inventory and mapping of rural landscapes. This presentation provides an update on the ICOMOS-IFLA ISCCL World Rural Landscape Initiative (WRLI) (www.worldrurallandscapes.org). The WRLI components (Principles, Atlas, Glossary, Bibliography) reveal the methods and processes relevant to the inventory, classification and interpretation of rural landscapes, both outstanding and ordinary or representative landscapes. Although complicated and challenging, local application of the methods and processes are necessary for World Heritage management regimes.

Paper 11.3: The need for diverse lenses to support rural landscape heritage. The ICOMOS-IFLA 2017 Principles provide a comprehensive outline of the fields and work required to better recognize and safeguard rural landscape heritage. This presentation will consider the scope of disciplinary expertise required to apply the Principles and outline some of the ways that diverse disciplines can best work together to achieve the aspirational goals stated in the Principles document.