Workshop Format// Formats des Ateliers

Paper in a panel / paper dans un panneau

DOI

https://doi.org/10.7275/n0ch-fg25

Organizer/Presenter/author Information // Informations sur l'organisateur / le présentateur / auteurs

Kuang-Chung Lee, National Dong-Hwa University, TaiwanFollow

Biographical Information // Informations biographiques

Kuang-Chung Lee is an associate Professor in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies at National Dong-Hwa University (NDHU) in Taiwan. He holds a Ph.D. in Geography from the University College of London (2001). After completing his undergraduate studies in Geography at National Taiwan University in 1989, he worked for the Council of Agriculture and the Taroko National Park in Taiwan. He has carried out more than 30 research projects which mainly focus on community participation, natural and cultural landscape conservation, collaborative planning, and management of protected areas and rural areas. He is currently a member of IUCN’s World Commission on Protected Areas, ICOMOS and ProGEO, He serves as the focal point at his university for the International Partnership of the Satoyama Initiative.

Keywords

Cultural Landscapes, Rural Heritage, CultureNature, NatureCulture, culture nature integration

Abstract // Résumé

Landscapes can be regarded as ‘a culture–nature link.’ Many examples of ‘living’ landscapes in the world are rich in natural and cultural values and have proven sustainable over centuries because of their maintenance by local communities. Satoyama, a traditional socio-ecological production landscape, provides a functional linkage between paddy fields and the associated environment with many ecosystem services. The idea of landscape conservation and paddy field revitalization was introduced into Taiwan’s amended Cultural Heritage Preservation Act in 2005 as a new legal instrument entitled ‘Cultural Landscape.’ To help stakeholders from governmental authorities and local communities apply this new instrument, this action research employed a community-based landscape and participatory approach to put relevant international concepts into practice. Learning from culturally grounded indicators of resilience in social–ecological systems, the study adopted a set of indicators of resilience in socio-ecological production landscapes and seascapes to successfully help residents evaluate the management of a designated Cultural Landscape through a series of local workshops. The case study shows that a landscape and participatory approach can be welcomed by rural people and can create a new style for ‘living’ protected landscapes in Taiwan’s nationally protected area system.

Bibliographic References // Références Bibliographiques

Adger, W. N. (2000) Social and Ecological Resilience: Are They Related? Progress in Human Geography 24 (3): 347–364.

Amend, T., Brown, J., Kothari, A., Phillips, A., Stolton, S. (eds.) (2008) Protected Landscapes and Agrobiodiversity Values. Volume 1 in the series, Protected Landscapes and Seascapes, IUCN & GTZ. Kasparek Verlag, Heidelberg.

Béné, C., Newsham, A., Davies, M. (2013) Making the Most of Resilience. IDS In Focus Policy Brief 32, Brighton: IDS. http://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/123456789/2370

Bennett, E. M., Cumming, G.S., Peterson, G.D. (2005) A systems model approach to determining resilience surrogates for case studies. Ecosystems, 8(8):945-957.

Bergamini, N., Blasiak, R., Eyzaguirre, P., Ichikawa, K., Mijatovic, D., Nakao, F., Subramanian, S.M. (2013) Indicators of Resilience in Socioecological Production Landscapes (SEPLs). UNU-IAS policy report.

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Panel 3 Paper 3.1: Participatory planning and monitoring of protected landscapes: a case study of an indigenous rice paddy cultural landscape in Taiwan

Landscapes can be regarded as ‘a culture–nature link.’ Many examples of ‘living’ landscapes in the world are rich in natural and cultural values and have proven sustainable over centuries because of their maintenance by local communities. Satoyama, a traditional socio-ecological production landscape, provides a functional linkage between paddy fields and the associated environment with many ecosystem services. The idea of landscape conservation and paddy field revitalization was introduced into Taiwan’s amended Cultural Heritage Preservation Act in 2005 as a new legal instrument entitled ‘Cultural Landscape.’ To help stakeholders from governmental authorities and local communities apply this new instrument, this action research employed a community-based landscape and participatory approach to put relevant international concepts into practice. Learning from culturally grounded indicators of resilience in social–ecological systems, the study adopted a set of indicators of resilience in socio-ecological production landscapes and seascapes to successfully help residents evaluate the management of a designated Cultural Landscape through a series of local workshops. The case study shows that a landscape and participatory approach can be welcomed by rural people and can create a new style for ‘living’ protected landscapes in Taiwan’s nationally protected area system.

 

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