Workshop Format// Formats des Ateliers

Poster/ Affiches

DOI

https://doi.org/10.7275/zjmc-jw97

Organizer/Presenter/author Information // Informations sur l'organisateur / le présentateur / auteurs

Raffaella Laviscio, Politecnico di MilanoFollow
Lionella Scazzosi, Politecnico di MilanoFollow
Laura PelissettiFollow
Renata LodariFollow

Biographical Information // Informations biographiques

Raffaella Laviscio, Architect, Phd, is an adjunct professor at Politecnico di Milano (Italy) where she carries out research on protection and enhancement of cultural heritage and landscape in the context of national and international research programs. She is member of ICOMOS Italia and ISCCL and responsible for the scientific and organizational secretariat of the "World Rural Landscape Initiative". She is expert member of several Landscape Commission in Milan metropolitan area. She has participated in national and international conferences on the theme of cultural heritage and landscape. She is author of publications on the issues of knowledge and evaluation of cultural heritage.

Lionella Scazzosi, PhD is an Architect and Full Professor at the Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Scazzosi has many designations including: author, consultant for the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Landscape for landscape policies; Council of Europe expert for the implementation of the European Landscape Convention; member of the ICOMOS-IFLA International Scientific Committee on Cultural Landscapes (ISCCL) and voting member for Italy; convener of the ISCCL World Rural Landscape Initiative and the ICOMOS Doctrinal Text “Principles on Rural Landscapes as Heritage”; and scientific director of national and international research on landscape preservation and management, and landscape enhancement policies and cultures.

Laura Pelissetti is Italian member of the ICOMOS-IFLA International Scientific Committee on Cultural Landscapes and AIAPP (Italian Association of Landscape Architecture). Presidency and coordination of ReGiS network, a no-profit organisation that promotes exchanging of experiences between governing and managing Institutions of Lombard public parks and gardens. Scientific and technical supervision of Centro Documentazione Storica [Historical Research Center] activities: research to preserve and restore the local Cultural Heritage (especially Villa Ghirlanda Silva and its public garden). From the 2004 scientific coordination of International meetings; scientific consultation, documents search and archiving, to update the historical knowledge of Royal Park of Monza and the Racconigi Castle Royal Park.

Renata Lodari is Italian member of ICOMOS-IFLA International Scientific Committee on Cultural Landscapes and AIAPP (Italian Association of Landscape Architecture). Manager of the Villas and Gardens Archive of the Landscape Museum of Verbania.

Keywords

Cultural Landscapes, Rural heritage, Rural landscape, villa, rural system, documentation

Abstract // Résumé

The villa-garden as core of agricultural enterprise spreads in the North of Italy particularly since the second half of the XVII century. Throughout the eighteenth century, there was the flowering of large stately villas that, in addition to villas of delight, are configured as "centers of capitalist investment in the land economy and as centers for reorganization of the agricultural landscape in large rural estates" (Sereni 1961, p.289). Thus, some of the Royal House's Residences in Piemonte also affect the structure of the surrounding land where the gardens and parks became the core of the land shape to improve the agricultural income and hence to promote a modern agricultural management of the estates. Both the Venaria Reale palace, with an agricultural texture of the areas outside the gardens, designed by Juvarra between 1725 and 1730, and the Racconigi Castle, where the new landscape layout designed by Kürten (1820-1832) became the headquarters of the royal farms respectively in the adjacent royal estates of La Mandria (from 1860) and Migliabruna (from 1835). In Lombardy a very particular case is that of the Royal Villa and the park of Monza where, with the project of Canonica in 1808, the agricultural character of Brianza affected the park that was thus surrounded by arable land, vineyards, orchards, mulberry trees, as well as large portions of woodland, used as a hunting reserve (De Giacomi, 1989). The park was laid-out as a self-sufficient farm, while the productive issues affected the architecture of the garden, where optical cones and perspective views were directed to the discovery of the agricultural landscape. The garden and the park also shaped the surrounding agricultural landscape. Many other case studies in northern Italy attest, with different degrees of permanence, the inseparable link between villa, garden and agricultural landscape.

Bibliographic References // Références Bibliographiques

Cazzato V. (2009), Atlante del giardino italiano: 1750-1940: dizionario biografico di architetti, giardinieri, botanici, committenti, letterati e altri protagonisti: Italia settentrionale, Volume 2, Istituto poligrafico e Zecca dello Stato, Libreria dello Stato

Dal Pozzolo L. (2010), Racconigi: cura e gestione di una dimora reale, Allemandi

De Giacomi F. (ed.) (1989), Il parco reale di Monza, Monza: Associazione pro Monza

Sereni E. (1961), Storia del paesaggio agrario italiano, Laterza, Bari

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Between agriculture and delight: villas, gardens and agricultural landscape in northern Italy

The villa-garden as core of agricultural enterprise spreads in the North of Italy particularly since the second half of the XVII century. Throughout the eighteenth century, there was the flowering of large stately villas that, in addition to villas of delight, are configured as "centers of capitalist investment in the land economy and as centers for reorganization of the agricultural landscape in large rural estates" (Sereni 1961, p.289). Thus, some of the Royal House's Residences in Piemonte also affect the structure of the surrounding land where the gardens and parks became the core of the land shape to improve the agricultural income and hence to promote a modern agricultural management of the estates. Both the Venaria Reale palace, with an agricultural texture of the areas outside the gardens, designed by Juvarra between 1725 and 1730, and the Racconigi Castle, where the new landscape layout designed by Kürten (1820-1832) became the headquarters of the royal farms respectively in the adjacent royal estates of La Mandria (from 1860) and Migliabruna (from 1835). In Lombardy a very particular case is that of the Royal Villa and the park of Monza where, with the project of Canonica in 1808, the agricultural character of Brianza affected the park that was thus surrounded by arable land, vineyards, orchards, mulberry trees, as well as large portions of woodland, used as a hunting reserve (De Giacomi, 1989). The park was laid-out as a self-sufficient farm, while the productive issues affected the architecture of the garden, where optical cones and perspective views were directed to the discovery of the agricultural landscape. The garden and the park also shaped the surrounding agricultural landscape. Many other case studies in northern Italy attest, with different degrees of permanence, the inseparable link between villa, garden and agricultural landscape.

 

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