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ORCID

0000-0002-4661-1435

Access Type

Open Access Thesis

Document Type

thesis

Degree Program

Psychology

Degree Type

Master of Science (M.S.)

Year Degree Awarded

2023

Month Degree Awarded

February

Abstract

In recent decades, conceptualizations of fatherhood have changed from a breadwinner ideal to fathers as caregivers. Despite this shift, fathers’ involvement with their children, on average, remains less than mothers’ involvement. This study examines the role of fathers’ gender roles (i.e., gender-role attitudes and provider-role attitudes) and work conditions (i.e., flexibility, supervisor and coworker support) as they independently, and in combination, predict father involvement with infants. Using a sample of 77 working class fathers, a series of path analyses were conducted with both mothers’ and fathers’ report of fathers’ involvement in fun and instrumental caregiving tasks. Results revealed that fathers with more egalitarian gender-role beliefs were more involved in fun tasks as reported by fathers, while fathers with more egalitarian provider-role beliefs were more involved in fun tasks as reported by mothers. Coworker support was associated with more instrumental and fun involvement. Fathers’ beliefs about gender-roles and their workplace flexibility interacted to predict their involvement in fun tasks, with more traditional fathers being more involved under conditions of high workplace flexibility. DocuSign Envelope ID: 5FB77C96-7C55-433C-B99A-496205649C1F iv Fathers’ provider-role beliefs interacted with their flexibility to predict mothers’ reports of their involvement in fun tasks, with more traditional fathers being more involved under conditions of high workplace flexibility. Thus, workplace flexibility may be an important predictor of father involvement for more traditional fathers, who would otherwise be less involved than their egalitarian counterparts. This study underscores the importance of supportive work conditions to increase involvement in fathers who would otherwise be less involved.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.7275/33508245

First Advisor

Maureen Perry-Jenkins

Second Advisor

Kirby Deater-Deckard

Third Advisor

Harold Grotevant

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