Event Title

Session A7: Migrational Behavior of PIT-Tagged Fish at Geesthacht Weir, River Elbe, Germany

Location

Groningen, The Netherlands

Event Website

http://fishpassage.umass.edu/

Start Date

24-6-2015 12:05 PM

End Date

24-6-2015 12:30 PM

Description

Abstract:

Nearby the town of Geesthacht, 35 km upstream of Hamburg, exist the only one migration barrier for fish on the German side of the Elbe. This weir was built in 1960 to regulate the tidal influence and to obtain a constant water level upstream. Since 1998 fish passage is provided by a natural-like bypass channel on the left side of the river. On August 1st 2010 Europe’s biggest fish pass, designed as a vertical double slot pass, was put into operation on the other stream side. Ever since a fully extended fish ecological long-term monitoring was established at that location. An essential part of this monitoring is the use of HDXTechnology (= Half Duplex) to assess fish migration on short and long Scale. In this context up to 10.000 specimens of anadromous and potamodromous species per annum, e. g. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis), burbot (Lota lota) and ide (Leucisus idus) are individually tagged with PIT-Tags (= Passive Integrated Transponder) and released at both river banks up to 3 km downstream the tailwater of the weir. Redetection of upstream migrating tagged individuals is facilitated by frame antennas, which are positioned within the corridors of both fish passes. 7 antennas in the old and 23 in the new fish pass, observe automatically and continuously as well as time-, site- and individual-specific the migratory behaviour. Due to this complex setup at the monitoring site and an above average amount of marked individuals it is possible to get detailed and unique information about fish behavioural patterns in the tailwater of the weir and in different fish pass types as well as the period of time needed for the passage of fishways. The results that have been determined will be presented.

Comments

Presenting Author: Nicola Mast is a professional of Landscape architecture and is employed at the Institute of applied ecology since 2010. From June 2013 Nicola Mast is co-commissioned with the management of the branch office Elbe. Surveys of fisheries at the pumped-storage hydropower plant as well as long term fish ecology monitoring at the weir Geesthacht are part of her obligations. Apart from this Ms. Mast also conducted studies on migration patterns by means of acoustic Telemetry and HDX Pit Tag Transponder Technology. Furthermore she investigated the fish stock of streams in the state of Hesse within the scope of the Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EG. Ms. Mast holds a diploma of engineering in landscape architecture from the University of Weihenstephan, where she graduated in 2009.

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Jun 24th, 12:05 PM Jun 24th, 12:30 PM

Session A7: Migrational Behavior of PIT-Tagged Fish at Geesthacht Weir, River Elbe, Germany

Groningen, The Netherlands

Abstract:

Nearby the town of Geesthacht, 35 km upstream of Hamburg, exist the only one migration barrier for fish on the German side of the Elbe. This weir was built in 1960 to regulate the tidal influence and to obtain a constant water level upstream. Since 1998 fish passage is provided by a natural-like bypass channel on the left side of the river. On August 1st 2010 Europe’s biggest fish pass, designed as a vertical double slot pass, was put into operation on the other stream side. Ever since a fully extended fish ecological long-term monitoring was established at that location. An essential part of this monitoring is the use of HDXTechnology (= Half Duplex) to assess fish migration on short and long Scale. In this context up to 10.000 specimens of anadromous and potamodromous species per annum, e. g. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis), burbot (Lota lota) and ide (Leucisus idus) are individually tagged with PIT-Tags (= Passive Integrated Transponder) and released at both river banks up to 3 km downstream the tailwater of the weir. Redetection of upstream migrating tagged individuals is facilitated by frame antennas, which are positioned within the corridors of both fish passes. 7 antennas in the old and 23 in the new fish pass, observe automatically and continuously as well as time-, site- and individual-specific the migratory behaviour. Due to this complex setup at the monitoring site and an above average amount of marked individuals it is possible to get detailed and unique information about fish behavioural patterns in the tailwater of the weir and in different fish pass types as well as the period of time needed for the passage of fishways. The results that have been determined will be presented.

https://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2015/June24/80