Workshop Format// Formats des Ateliers

Paper in a panel / paper dans un panneau

DOI

https://doi.org/10.7275/sx93-kw49

Organizer/Presenter/author Information // Informations sur l'organisateur / le présentateur / auteurs

Steve H. Brown Dr, The University of SydneyFollow
Cari Goetcheus, University of GeorgiaFollow

Biographical Information // Informations biographiques

Steve Brown is an Honorary Associate with the Museum and Heritage Studies Program at the University of Sydney and a Lecturer at the University of Canberra, Australia. His research interests include the integration of NatureCulture in heritage management. He is a co-editor of Cultural and Spiritual Significance of Nature in Protected Areas: Governance, Management and Policy (2018) and former President of the ICOMOS-IFLA International Scientific Committee on Cultural Landscapes (ISCCL).

Cari Goetcheus is an Associate Professor in the College of Environment and Design (CED) at the University of Georgia (UGA). Cari’s expertise lies in cultural landscape research, documentation and management. Her research interests include landscape preservation education, vernacular and ethnographic land use history, and heritage management. Goetcheus is the Director of the UGA CED Cultural Landscape Lab, and currently co-authoring with Steve Brown the Routledge Handbook on Cultural Landscape Practice.

Keywords

Cultural landscapes, rural heritage, Rural landscapes, documentation, multi-disciplinarily

Abstract // Résumé

The ICOMOS-IFLA Principles Concerning Rural Landscape as Heritage (the Principles; 2017) provide a comprehensive outline of the fields and work required to better recognise and safeguard rural landscape heritage. The Principles acknowledge that the field of heritage conservation cannot sustain rural places and traditional rural heritage landscapes on their own, but must engage with a diverse breadth of disciplines to support and safeguard these spaces. The Principles seek to address loss and adverse changes to rural landscapes and their associated communities through the recognition, safeguarding, and promotion of their heritage values. They aim to promote an appropriate balance between economic, social, cultural, and environmental studies and practices. To achieve this, local communities, advocacy groups, and disciplinary experts must necessarily work together to achieve the aspirational goals presented in the Principles document.

The Principles provide specific measures related to understanding, protecting, sustainably managing, and communicating the heritage values of rural landscapes. This presentation will provide examples of the disciplinary expertise required to apply the Principles, with particular emphasis on the actions associated with understanding and documenting rural landscapes. We argue strongly for the need to engage with skills across the spectra of academic and applied disciplines, which include the humanities (e.g., history, philosophy, languages, cultural studies, religious studies, law, politics), social sciences (e.g., anthropology, archaeology, landscape architecture, heritage conservation, geography, economics), and sciences (e.g., geology, geomorphology, hydrology, ecology, botany, zoology). We also outline some of the methods – qualitative, quantitative, and comparative – necessary for interdisciplinary collaboration; and consider the role of post-humanism, integration of cultural and natural systems, and rights-based approaches in undertaking collaborative projects. We emphasise the need for all collaborative and intra-disciplinary work to be driven by local communities (as evidenced in many cooperative groups in the handicraft sector, for example).

Bibliographic References // Références Bibliographiques

Alanen, Arnold and Robert Z. Melnick 2000. Preserving Cultural Landscapes in America. John Hopkins University Press.

Howard, Peter, Ian Thompson, Emma Waterton, and Mick Atha 2019. The Routledge Companion to Landscape Studies. Second Edition. Routledge.

ICOMOS 2017. ICOMOS-IFLA Principles Concerning Rural Landscape as Heritage. Available from: .

Kalman, Harold 2014. Heritage Planning: Principles and Process. Routledge.

Waterton, Emma and Steve Watson 2015. The Palgrave Handbook of Contemporary Heritage Research. Palgrave Macmillan.

Share

COinS
 

Panel 11. Paper 11.3: Views through rose-colored glasses: the need for diverse lenses to support rural landscape heritage

The ICOMOS-IFLA Principles Concerning Rural Landscape as Heritage (the Principles; 2017) provide a comprehensive outline of the fields and work required to better recognise and safeguard rural landscape heritage. The Principles acknowledge that the field of heritage conservation cannot sustain rural places and traditional rural heritage landscapes on their own, but must engage with a diverse breadth of disciplines to support and safeguard these spaces. The Principles seek to address loss and adverse changes to rural landscapes and their associated communities through the recognition, safeguarding, and promotion of their heritage values. They aim to promote an appropriate balance between economic, social, cultural, and environmental studies and practices. To achieve this, local communities, advocacy groups, and disciplinary experts must necessarily work together to achieve the aspirational goals presented in the Principles document.

The Principles provide specific measures related to understanding, protecting, sustainably managing, and communicating the heritage values of rural landscapes. This presentation will provide examples of the disciplinary expertise required to apply the Principles, with particular emphasis on the actions associated with understanding and documenting rural landscapes. We argue strongly for the need to engage with skills across the spectra of academic and applied disciplines, which include the humanities (e.g., history, philosophy, languages, cultural studies, religious studies, law, politics), social sciences (e.g., anthropology, archaeology, landscape architecture, heritage conservation, geography, economics), and sciences (e.g., geology, geomorphology, hydrology, ecology, botany, zoology). We also outline some of the methods – qualitative, quantitative, and comparative – necessary for interdisciplinary collaboration; and consider the role of post-humanism, integration of cultural and natural systems, and rights-based approaches in undertaking collaborative projects. We emphasise the need for all collaborative and intra-disciplinary work to be driven by local communities (as evidenced in many cooperative groups in the handicraft sector, for example).

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.