Author Bios (50 Words)

Bingjie Liu-Lastres

Bingjie “Becky” Liu-Lastres serves as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Tourism, Event, and Sport Management at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. Her main research interests include risk and crisis communication/management in tourism and hospitality, tourist safety and security, social media in tourism and hospitality, and tourism management.

Ignatius P. Cahyanto

Ignatius Cahyanto is an assistant Professor in the Department of Marketing and Hospitality at University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He is particularly interested in understanding transient population (e.g. visitors) behavior and their decision-making process in the event of major crises.

Abstract (150 Words)

The purpose of this study is to explore residents’ roles as risk insiders in tourism crisis management. Particularly, this study used the recent event of Red Tides in Florida as the context and surveyed 969 potential visitors and 460 Florida residents. The preliminary findings indicated that visitors tend to rely on residents for risk related information. Guided by the social identity theory, this study further investigated the main drivers of Florida residents’ information-sharing behavior. The results indicated that both subjective knowledge and social identity influenced residents’ willingness to share risk information with visitors and their actual behavior. Based on the findings, this study further discussed a new research direction that involves residents in tourism crisis management. This study also offers practical implications on how to encourage residents to participate in the information-exchange process in tourism crisis management.

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Exploring Residents’ Roles as Risk Insiders in Tourism Crisis Management

The purpose of this study is to explore residents’ roles as risk insiders in tourism crisis management. Particularly, this study used the recent event of Red Tides in Florida as the context and surveyed 969 potential visitors and 460 Florida residents. The preliminary findings indicated that visitors tend to rely on residents for risk related information. Guided by the social identity theory, this study further investigated the main drivers of Florida residents’ information-sharing behavior. The results indicated that both subjective knowledge and social identity influenced residents’ willingness to share risk information with visitors and their actual behavior. Based on the findings, this study further discussed a new research direction that involves residents in tourism crisis management. This study also offers practical implications on how to encourage residents to participate in the information-exchange process in tourism crisis management.