Author Bios (50 Words)

Bruno Ferreira <bsimoes@ncsu.edu> is a doctoral candidate in Equitable and Sustainable Tourism at North Carolina State University. His research focuses on the psychological antecedents of tourism microentrepreneurship, in particular the role of the tourism e-microentrepreneurial self-efficacy mechanism in human agency among individuals with vulnerable livelihoods. Other areas of interest include permatourism, social entrepreneurship and development through sport. Bruno has worked in Europe, Africa and South America as a researcher, instructor, project manager and consultant in community development projects leveraging the economic muscle of tourism to create economic opportunities. In the future, he wants to continue to carry out engaged research and contribute to making tourism a force for good.

Abstract (150 Words)

Despite receiving harsh criticisms from academia, the model of enclave tourism continues to be widely implemented by transnational conglomerates. Accordingly, enclave mass tourism development, materialized in the form of all-inclusive, self-contained resorts, may create apparent socioeconomic apartheid at destinations, through removing locals from tourist spaces where host-guest exchanges are most likely to occur. However, preliminary results from a qualitative study being conducted in Bahía de Banderas — Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, suggest that despite adverse conditions, microentrepreneurs are still able to glean some economic opportunities. Microentrepreneurs must be extremely judicious in how they choose to take advantage of available opportunities; there seems to be a thin line between moderate success on the one hand and total failure on the other, with immediate repercussions in their livelihoods.

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Resisting socioeconomic apartheid through tourism microentrepreneurship in Bahía de Banderas — Puerto Vallarta

Despite receiving harsh criticisms from academia, the model of enclave tourism continues to be widely implemented by transnational conglomerates. Accordingly, enclave mass tourism development, materialized in the form of all-inclusive, self-contained resorts, may create apparent socioeconomic apartheid at destinations, through removing locals from tourist spaces where host-guest exchanges are most likely to occur. However, preliminary results from a qualitative study being conducted in Bahía de Banderas — Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, suggest that despite adverse conditions, microentrepreneurs are still able to glean some economic opportunities. Microentrepreneurs must be extremely judicious in how they choose to take advantage of available opportunities; there seems to be a thin line between moderate success on the one hand and total failure on the other, with immediate repercussions in their livelihoods.