Author Bios (50 Words)

Claudia Gil Arroyo is a Ph.D. student at North Carolina State University in the Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management. Her research is focused on sustainable community development, craft-beverage tourism, and agritourism.

Whitney Knollenberg is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management at North Carolina State University. Her research focuses on tourism leadership and the influence of policy, planning, and partnerships in sustainable tourism development.

Carla Barbieri is a Professor in Sustainable Tourism (North Carolina State University, USA) where she leads the “Agritourism & Societal Wellbeing” lab. She investigates the economic, socio-cultural, and environmental impacts of agritourism at the farm household and society levels. She also studies the sustainability of niche tourism.

Abstract (150 Words)

Craft-beverage tourism (CBT) is a growing segment in the USA and an attractive strategy for sustainable development. Hyperlocal strategies are suitable for this segment because the perception of craft beverages being authentic cultural representations is appealing to tourists. This study aims to identify the resources that facilitate this development by combining two theoretical models; determine the role of hyperlocal strategies in CBT development; and test the resulting model in a different context. A mixed method approach in three phases will address these objectives. Data from the first phase revealed that creativity and meaning accelerated the growth of the community capitals needed for CBT, causing a spiraling up effect. The second phase will provide evidence of the impact of hyperlocal strategies in CBT experiences. Outcomes from the study’s third phase will further improve CBT development efforts and consolidate CBT knowledge, and hyperlocality’s role in different contexts and development stages.


Share

COinS
 

Mixing Community Capitals and Creative Placemaking for Craft-Beverage Tourism Development

Craft-beverage tourism (CBT) is a growing segment in the USA and an attractive strategy for sustainable development. Hyperlocal strategies are suitable for this segment because the perception of craft beverages being authentic cultural representations is appealing to tourists. This study aims to identify the resources that facilitate this development by combining two theoretical models; determine the role of hyperlocal strategies in CBT development; and test the resulting model in a different context. A mixed method approach in three phases will address these objectives. Data from the first phase revealed that creativity and meaning accelerated the growth of the community capitals needed for CBT, causing a spiraling up effect. The second phase will provide evidence of the impact of hyperlocal strategies in CBT experiences. Outcomes from the study’s third phase will further improve CBT development efforts and consolidate CBT knowledge, and hyperlocality’s role in different contexts and development stages.