Gender and Development

Permanent URI for this collection

Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 5 of 6
  • Publication
    The Impact of a Diversified Educational Program on Career Goals: Tororo Girls' School in the Context of Girls' Education in Uganda
    (1970) Evans, David R.; Schimmel, Gordon L.
    The research reported in this study was undertaken as part of an ongoing relatioship between the Government of Uganda, USAID, and the University of Massachusetts. The study was occasioned by a desire on the part of all the parties to better understand the impact of Tororo Girls' School and the implications of its diversified program in the context of Girls' education in Uganda. While too soon for evaluation of a school which had been in operation only five years, there was nevertheless considerable interest in looking at the contribution of the school to the education of girls in Uganda. There was also interest in the school because it represented one of three large-scale, diversified secondary schools set up jointly by American and African governments during the 1960s. The Ugandan government was interested in the study as a source of information for the ongoing policy decisions regarding the content and focus of girls' education in the country. The specific goals of the study involve looking closely at the backgrounds of the girls admitted to the secondary schools in the sample and then looking at the characteristics of the girls produced by these schools. Variables studied include: girls' expectations for further education, their occupational aspirations, their desired conditions of employment, and their attitudes toward their future roles in the country. Within this general setting the study focuses on the specialized curricula and the guidance program at Tororo which provided a unique model of a diversified girls' secondary school. Basically the question being asked is whether a program such as that at Tororo does a better job of preparing girls to become productive members of society than the programs which are typical of most schools at the moment. The study also looks at some of the internal dynamics of the Tororo program, particularly in terms of the way the girls view each of the specialized streams. The investigation centers on selection into the streams, activities during the two years of specialized training, and the influence of the training upon girls' expectations and subsequent employment experience.
  • Publication
    Women Centered Training
    (Center for International Education, 1979) Droegkamp, Janis; Munger, Fredi
    The goal of this paper is to define, generate and present for discussion a general women-centered training design model. Such a model could be used by trainers to create local workshops, skills building projects, seminars, conferences or other training programs which would be women-centered, responsive to specific objectives and in keeping with local customs, resources and constraints. The paper is divided into two sections. In the first section, general principles and assumptions influencing the thinking of the authors regarding women-centered training are presented. After a brief explanation, these assumptions guide a first attempt at defining purposes, perspectives and rationales for women-centered training. In the second section of the paper, a training design model is presented. This general model provides the guidelines and structure for the concluding sequence, a composite example of how the general model might be used to produce localized and specific training programs. The reader will not throughout this document that the authors chose to replace the plural noun "women" with the singular pronoun "her." This bending of the rules of rhetoric was deliberate as the grammatically correct pronoun did not seem to express the thoughts and sentiments of the authors accurately. Therefore, the repeated inclusion of this error is intentional and not due to editorial oversight.
  • Publication
    Participatory Evaluation Among Rural Women: Charting the Birth of Articulation and Power
    (Center for International Education, 1997) Benbow, Jane T
    A description of a pilot project to integrate women in Rose Hall, St. Vincent, Barbados into rural development. The book details the process whereby the women chose their own path to development. Their successful activities include creating adult education and pre-school programs and building a community center, illustrating how women in Rose Hall “do” development through their leadership and vision for their community’s development. By addressing important theoretical and practical implications of the project, this book makes a valuable contribution to the women in development discourse.
  • Publication
    African Women Organizing: Four Ways of Seeing
    (Center for International Education, 1990) Solomon, Marla J
    A study which looks at women’s organizations in Africa from various perspectives, including those which seeks “ways of seeing and knowing that move forward a feminist agenda,” and celebrates the experiences of being “woven in the text." This study is an effort to seek a deeper understanding of women's organizations in Africa, with the belief that understanding informs action. This search proceeds through several phases. First, I discuss how the way we "see" organizations influences how we work with them and create them. Starting with that idea, I develop a rationale for trying to view women's organizations from multiple perspectives, just as we increase our understanding of a sculpture by viewing from various angles and in various lights. Second, I delineate four broad and interconnected ways of seeing women in society, evident in literature relevant to studying African women. These ways of seeing are: - woman's sphere and woman's power - gender-class relationships - ideology and consciousness - women's voices For each way of seeing, I evaluate what it contributes to understanding African women's experience, and discuss the implications it holds for analyzing women's organizations. Finally I discuss what insights the four ways of seeing might offer to those who work with women's organizations. In looking at women's organizations, and at the frameworks that help us understand them, I am seeking ways of seeing and knowing that move forward a feminist agenda defined in these terms, and celebrate the experiences of being a woman in all their variety.
  • Publication
    Gender and Development: Women Centered Training
    (Center for International Education, 1979) Droegkamp, Janis; Munger, Fredi
    This note details issues and strategies pertinent to training for women. It outlines principles and assumptions behind women-centered training and presents a six-step training design. A variety of exercises are used throughout the text to help readers clarify their own attitudes toward the issues and practice their training skills. The goal of this paper is to define, generate and present for discussion a general women-centered training design model. Such a model could be used by trainers to create local workshops, skills building projects, seminars, conferences or other training programs which would be women-centered, responsive to specific objectives and in keeping with local customs, resources and constraints. The paper is divided into two sections. In the first section, general principles and assumptions influencing the thinking of the authors regarding women-centered training are presented. After a brief explanation, these assumptions guide a first attempt at defining purposes, perspectives and rationales for women-centered training. In the second section of the paper, a training design model is presented. This general model provides the guidelines and structure for the concluding sequence, a composite example of how the general model might be used to produce localized and specific training programs.