Presenter Bios (50 Words)

Gary Ellis is professor and Bradberry Chair in the Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences in the Texas A&M University System. His research focuses on immediate, structured experiences for tourists, park visitors, and youth.

Andrew Lacanienta is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Sciences at Texas A&M University. His research interests include immediate experiences, co-creation, and applications of role-playing.

Patti Freeman is a professor of Experience Design and Management and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education at Brigham Young University. Her current research focuses on understanding and explaining targeted outcomes of participating in structured recreation experiences. Her work has been published in several journals.

Brian Hill, Ph.D. is a Professor in the Department of Experience Design and Management in the Marriott School of Business at Brigham Young University. He teaches a large undergraduate course titled Creating a Good Life through Experience Design. His current research considers experiences in their various forms.

Abstract (150 Words)

Testing the Presumed Effects of Service Performance, Theme, Personalization, and Multisensory Appeal on Quality of Structured Experiences

Abstract

We evaluated service quality and experience structuring performance on subjective quality of experience in Hawaii. Two trained teams of education tourists visited major attractions on three Hawaiian Islands. One team (four members) evaluated service quality and experience structuring performance at each of 23 attractions while the other team (14 members) independently completed measures of the quality of their experiences at each attraction. Two hundred forty-seven experience equality observations were collected. Service quality was evaluated using the SERVQUAL dimensions identified by Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry and “experience industry” strategies identified by Pine and Gilmore. Quality of experience indicators included measures of prevalence of deep structured experience during the visit, perceived value of time invested, and delight with the experience. Results revealed a significant relation between service quality and the experience quality measures. The hypothesis that service quality performance interacts with experience structuring performance to affect experience quality was supported.

Share

COinS
 

Testing the Presumed Effects of Service Performance, Theme, Personalization, and Multisensory Appeal on Quality of Structured Experiences

Testing the Presumed Effects of Service Performance, Theme, Personalization, and Multisensory Appeal on Quality of Structured Experiences

Abstract

We evaluated service quality and experience structuring performance on subjective quality of experience in Hawaii. Two trained teams of education tourists visited major attractions on three Hawaiian Islands. One team (four members) evaluated service quality and experience structuring performance at each of 23 attractions while the other team (14 members) independently completed measures of the quality of their experiences at each attraction. Two hundred forty-seven experience equality observations were collected. Service quality was evaluated using the SERVQUAL dimensions identified by Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry and “experience industry” strategies identified by Pine and Gilmore. Quality of experience indicators included measures of prevalence of deep structured experience during the visit, perceived value of time invested, and delight with the experience. Results revealed a significant relation between service quality and the experience quality measures. The hypothesis that service quality performance interacts with experience structuring performance to affect experience quality was supported.