Presenter Bios (50 Words)

Dr. Courtney Suess, Ph.D. is an assistant professor in Tourism and Hospitality in the Department of Recreation, Parks and Tourism Sciences and Texas A & M University. Her research interests include tourism and hospitality facilities design, service, environmental psychology, consumer experience and behavior.

Dr. Makarand Mody, Ph.D. is an assistant professor of marketing in the School of Hospitality Administration at Boston University. His research interests include consumer behavior, marketing, experiences, branding and loyalty.

Dr. Tarik Dogru Ph.D. is an assistant professor of hospitality finance and accounting in the School of Hospitality Administration at Boston University. His research interests include hospitality finance, corporate finance, behavioral finance, franchising, tourism economics, and climate change

Abstract (150 Words)

Airbnb continues to gain popularity as an alternative to hotels, with the home-like setting being a critical differentiating factor. However, the tourism literature has not explored whether and how accommodation environments are facilitating traveler “at home” experiences and the impact of these experiences on the critical outcome of well being. The purpose of this study is twofold. First, we develop a model of homescape in the accommodations industry and identify, operationalize, and measure its components. Second, we examine the impact of the homescape on travelers’ experience and overall well-being in both Airbnb and hotel accommodations. Surveying 740 participants who were traveling to receive healthcare services, we found in both Hotels and Airbnb that the homescape (community, home-design congruence, and esthetics) influence travelers’ experience of feeling “at home”, which, in turn, positively influences their well-being. Implications for theory, practice, and areas of future research are discussed.

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There’s no place like home! The Impact of Accommodations Homescape on Traveler Well-being

Airbnb continues to gain popularity as an alternative to hotels, with the home-like setting being a critical differentiating factor. However, the tourism literature has not explored whether and how accommodation environments are facilitating traveler “at home” experiences and the impact of these experiences on the critical outcome of well being. The purpose of this study is twofold. First, we develop a model of homescape in the accommodations industry and identify, operationalize, and measure its components. Second, we examine the impact of the homescape on travelers’ experience and overall well-being in both Airbnb and hotel accommodations. Surveying 740 participants who were traveling to receive healthcare services, we found in both Hotels and Airbnb that the homescape (community, home-design congruence, and esthetics) influence travelers’ experience of feeling “at home”, which, in turn, positively influences their well-being. Implications for theory, practice, and areas of future research are discussed.